Protein Stuff

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Postby [old] Ben Rea » February 27th, 2006, 1:09 pm

i just got back from florida but while i was down there i bought this whey protein stuff and i was wondering if i will be seeing results from it if i drink it daily after workouts. its tasty stuff so i can keep it up. i just hope there are good results. will it still work if im doing cardio workouts almost every day of the week and almost no wieght lifting? does it work with cardio?
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Postby [old] Steelhead » March 1st, 2006, 3:28 pm

<!--quoteo(post=57430:date=Feb 27 2006, 09:09 AM:name=Ben Rea)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Ben Rea @ Feb 27 2006, 09:09 AM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>i just got back from florida but while i was down there i bought this whey protein stuff and i was wondering if i will be seeing results from it if i drink it daily after workouts. its tasty stuff so i can keep it up. i just hope there are good results. will it still work if im doing cardio workouts almost every day of the week and almost no wieght lifting? does it work with cardio?<br /> </td></tr></table><br />More complex carbohydrates will help you more than a protein drink vis-a-vis rowing IMO. Also with weight lifting will be benefited by more glycogen. Basically, a typical diet gives us all the protein we need and more, but not always the glycogen stores for sport success. I don't know if we have to go this extreme, but 9-Gold Medal winner Carl Lewis said, "My best athletic performances were after I went vegan." That means no whey protein, but I wonder how much soy he was eating? <br /><br />Mike<br />
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Postby [old] Yukon John » March 1st, 2006, 5:03 pm

More complex carbohydrates will help you more than a protein drink vis-a-vis rowing IMO. Also with weight lifting will be benefited by more glycogen. Basically, a typical diet gives us all the protein we need and more, but not always the glycogen stores for sport success. I don't know if we have to go this extreme, but 9-Gold Medal winner Carl Lewis said, "My best athletic performances were after I went vegan." That means no whey protein, but I wonder how much soy he was eating? <br /><br />Mike
[/quote]<br /><br />Good points Mike! Also, if there is too much protein in the body it puts a lot of strain on the urinary system and can lead to some pretty nasty complications. Athletes do use a bit more protein than the average Joe, but it's pretty minimal and like you said, a normal diet with the complex carbs will give you all you need. I read about one experiment where a group of individuals had a diet of only whole wheat bread, kind of boring, but it provided all the protein that there bodies needed. So it's a good idea to stay away from protein overload!. I'm a vegan myself, and it is very easy to get all of the protein you need without seeking extra. I'd be careful of the whey protein too. Of course, that is milk protein and in a book called the China Study (a good read!) An experiment was done using rats where the control group had no milk or animal protein and the experimental group had the equivilent (in % of diet) to what the normal north american diet has with milk. "All" of the experimental group died of cancer, none of the control group did! That's rats, not people, but it does make you think a bit!
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Postby [old] johnmcclellan » March 1st, 2006, 6:34 pm

Assuming you've done a solid cardio workout, you want to optimize glycogen recovery as well as muscle repair. There is a lot of research that shows a carb+protein recovery drink at a 3 or 4:1 ratio works the best. The E-caps website has some good info on this (you need to wade through their marketing spin, however), and also there are a couple books by Dr. Michael Ross that have some explanation of the science of post workout recovery, w/o the e-caps marketing stuff (I do use e-caps products, however). My own experience w/ whey based recovery drinks is good, but equally good with soy. As a cyclist starting to do some rowing as a borderline lightweight, I'm not looking for any muscle mass gains, just good recovery so I'm ready to go at it full strength the next day.<br /><br />Good luck!
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Postby [old] Ben Rea » March 1st, 2006, 8:56 pm

how much protein should i be taking in each day(grams)? considering I workout<br /><br />with just the protein mix with milk i get 28 grams, then plus all the other food i eat.
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Postby [old] Yukon John » March 1st, 2006, 11:26 pm

<!--quoteo--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE</b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'><!--quotec--><!--quoteo(post=58003:date=Mar 1 2006, 04:56 PM:name=Ben Rea)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Ben Rea @ Mar 1 2006, 04:56 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>how much protein should i be taking in each day(grams)? considering I workout<br /><br />with just the protein mix with milk i get 28 grams, then plus all the other food i eat.<br /> </td></tr></table> </td></tr></table><br /><br />The information below comes from this website <a href="http://www.thedoctorwillseeyounow.com/articles/nutrition/protein_2/" target="_blank">http://www.thedoctorwillseeyounow.com/arti...tion/protein_2/</a>. I've checked out a few and this one is pretty good and goes along with what most others are saying. The average person needs .8 g per kg per day. Endurance training increase their protein needs to about 1 to 1.2 g per kg per day, well above the RDA. In contrast, for subjects performing resistance exercises or weight lifting, the RDA for protein seems to be adequate. In resistance training, you are building up muscle and protein is used more efficiently. (Interesting eh? That the ones that are most likely to increase their protein intake don't need it!) <br /><br />When people start consuming too much protein (over 2.0 g/kg/d), the extra protein can become a stressful stimulus for the kidney. This is even more of a concern as we get older and our organs are less efficient and effective.<br /><br />Very high levels of dietary protein have also been correlated with increased urinary calcium excretion. The loss of calcium through urine could potentially be harmful for bone turnover, with the added risk of osteoporosis. Finally, protein requires vitamin B6 in order to be metabolized and ultimately utilized in the body. Very high levels of dietary protein increase the requirement for this B vitamin.<br /><br />So to get back to your question Ben, if you're eating a varied diet of "healthy food" you don't need the protein powder. I don't know how much you weight, but lets say it's 160 lbs (72.57kg.) 72.57X1.2=87. So from the information above, you wouldn't want to go much above 87 grams of protein total / day. If you want to really figure it out, you should write down everything that you eat for a few days and have that analysed to see how much protein you are getting with your normal diet. Better yet, talk to a dietition or a nutritionist. A dietition would also figure in that you are growing. This could change the numbers above. Most likely Ben, your regular diet is going to cover your training needs and the supplement that you bought isn't needed. As John M and Mike mentioned, what your body will need most is good quality complex carbs with regular amounts of protein. There is no silver bullet with diet, except maybe to eat lots of different things especially fruits and vegetables, and avoid the junk. Hope this helps. John<br /><br />p.s. Here is one tool for nutritional analysis that is free and on line. It takes work to figure out your daily intake of food, including lots of measuring of what you eat. But it can be fun too! <a href="http://nat.crgq.com/mainnat.html" target="_blank">http://nat.crgq.com/mainnat.html</a>
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Postby [old] Ben Rea » March 2nd, 2006, 7:31 am

wow, thanks john, thats some great information. so what would be the point of getting the protein supplement if you can just get enough through your daily meals?
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Postby [old] johnmcclellan » March 2nd, 2006, 9:36 am

<!--quoteo(post=58057:date=Mar 2 2006, 06:31 AM:name=Ben Rea)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Ben Rea @ Mar 2 2006, 06:31 AM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>wow, thanks john, thats some great information. so what would be the point of getting the protein supplement if you can just get enough through your daily meals?<br /> </td></tr></table><br /><br />Ben,<br />I think the primary reason for a supplement is convenience, and potentially protein quality, if you aren't getting a healthy balance of good protein in your regular diet (not all proteins are created equal - hence the need to balance different sources, particularly in a vegetarian/vegan diet). But a properly planned vegan diet can supply all the protein you need as well as a carnivorous diet. The research that John sites in terms of grams/KG body weight is 100% consistent with what I've read. In terms of convenience, I workout in the early am, and then need to get the kids ready for school, drop one of them off, and then drive 60 miles to be at work by 8:30. I would like to sit down and have a well balanced and luxurious breakfast - not going to happen. So a scoop of soy thrown into some juice or sports drink, along with whatever solid food I can grab as I race out the door, helps me get enough protein to (1) help the resynthesis of glycogen and (2) get the day going.
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Postby [old] johnmcclellan » March 2nd, 2006, 12:33 pm

<!--quoteo(post=58003:date=Mar 1 2006, 07:56 PM:name=Ben Rea)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Ben Rea @ Mar 1 2006, 07:56 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>how much protein should i be taking in each day(grams)? considering I workout<br /><br />with just the protein mix with milk i get 28 grams, then plus all the other food i eat.<br /> </td></tr></table><br /><br />This flash on recovery beverages just in from the weekly RoadBikeRider newsletter:<br /><br />---We've mentioned that chocolate milk is our favorite post-ride recovery beverage when we've traveled to an event and don't have one of those fancy commercial drinks handy. Maybe it should be our choice all the time. According to the March 6 edition of Sports Illustrated, a new study has found that "athletes who drank chocolate milk after a workout were able to exercise more intensely in a second workout than those who drank commercial sports beverages." The study's coauthor states: "Chocolate milk contains an optimal carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, which is critical for helping refuel tired muscles." Tastes yummy, too!<br /><br />_______________________<br />But, there is a lot of research (the dead rats mentioned above was a new one for me) that suggests that dairy products aren't optimal nutrition. But I've got a cyclist friend (ranked Cat 1 rider) who swears by raw milk (and meat). I'm not taking an advocacy position one way or the other. But I am trying to develop a taste for soy...
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Postby [old] slocheetah » March 2nd, 2006, 11:11 pm

doi: 10.1519/1533-4295(2005)27[32:PBMELB]2.0.CO;2<br />Strength and Conditioning Journal: Vol. 27, No. 4, pp. 32–33.<br />Protein Bars May Enhance Lean Body Mass<br />Jose Antonio, PhD, CSCS<br /><br />International Society of Sports Nutrition, Deerfield Beach, Florida<br /><br /> ABSTRACT<br /><br /> Strength and conditioning professionals should be cognizant of the nutrient needs of their athletes. The larger individual should supplement with protein (and calories) just to meet his or her daily nutrient requirements. It is suggested that supplementation with protein bars (or with beverages or powders) is a feasible method of receiving dietary energy and the essential amino acids needed to promote skeletal muscle growth and recovery.<br /><br />Protein intake plays an important role in promoting skeletal muscle hypertrophy and enhancing post-workout recovery (i.e., enhancing net protein balance) (2, 8). Does it matter if dietary protein is consumed as whole foods (e.g., beef, pork, chicken, fish) or as a supplement (e.g., ready-to-drink protein beverages, protein bars, protein powders)? A recent investigation examined the effect of protein bar supplementation on body composition alterations in young men from a university strength-training class. All subjects were considered experienced lifters with at least 1 year of experience in strength training. They were given daily servings of micronutrient-fortified protein bars containing soy or whey protein (33 g/d for 9 weeks, n = 9 for each protein treatment group). Subjects were randomly assigned in a double-blind manner to either a soy, whey, or control group. The controls did the exercise program but did not consume a protein product (n = 9 for each group). Each subject was instructed to consume 3 protein bars per day for the 9-week training period. Their daily diets were otherwise not altered. The strength-training protocol was 3 sets of 4–6 repetitions for 14 exercises that targeted major muscle groups: chest press, chest fly, incline press, lat pull-down, seated row, military press, lateral raise for the deltoids, preacher curl, bicep curl, supine triceps extension, seated triceps extension, leg press, calf raise, and abdominal crunch.<br /><br />Both the soy and whey treatment groups showed a gain in lean body mass, but the training-only group did not. This study did not show the actual pre- and postnumbers but instead presented the data as bar graphs. Thus, it is difficult to discern the exact pre- to post-training and supplementation changes. Nonetheless, according to Brown et al. (1), “soy and whey protein bar products both promoted exercise training-induced lean body mass gain.”<br /><br />Consuming protein supplements to help promote lean body mass gains is a common dietary practice among bodybuilders and other strength-power athletes. This study used resistance-trained subjects; thus, it is not surprising that the group who trained without protein bar supplementation did not realize significant gains in lean body mass. Conversely, protein supplementation with soy or whey assisted in lean body mass gains. However, it is not known when the protein bars were consumed. Clearly, if they were consumed pre- or postexercise, this could assist in lean body mass gains (5, 9, 12). This study did not control for this variable; therefore, it is not entirely clear if the gains in lean body mass were the result of proper nutrient timing or the mere addition of protein or energy. Nevertheless, this study does suggest that protein supplementation may improve body composition in resistance-trained subjects. This may help dispel the notion that soy protein is inferior to milk-based or meat proteins. In fact, a recent 6-month clinical trial on overweight individuals found that a diet high in soy protein and low in fat can induce significant fat loss in overweight and obese people while preserving muscle mass (4). Soy protein has been shown in well-controlled animal studies to prevent exercise-induced protein degradation in skeletal muscle via the inhibition calpain-mediated proteolysis (10). Furthermore, data show that whey protein supplementation (20 g/d for 3 months) in humans can increase peak power and 30-second work capacity and augment antioxidant defenses (6).<br /><br />It should be evident to the strength and conditioning professional that consuming sufficient dietary energy with a particular emphasis on protein is critical for promoting gains in lean body mass. Total protein and energy intake as well as nutrient timing play a key role in the adaptive response to exercise training (7, 8). It should also be emphasized that the notion that high protein intakes are harmful to an otherwise healthy individual has no factual basis. For example, one study investigated bodybuilders and other well-trained athletes with high and medium protein intake, respectively. The authors concluded that<br /><br /> it appears that protein intake under 2.8 grams daily per kilogram body weight does not impair renal function in well-trained athletes as indicated by the measures of renal function used in this study (11).<br /><br />Another investigation concluded that<br /><br /> increasing protein intake from 0.78 to 1.55 grams of protein daily per kilogram of body weight with meat supplements in combination with reducing carbohydrate intake did not alter urine calcium excretion, but was associated with higher circulating levels of IGF-I, a bone growth factor, and lowered levels of urinary N-telopeptide, a marker of bone resorption (3).<br /><br />Thus, contrary to the widely held (but incorrect) belief, consuming more protein as meat as an isocaloric substitution for carbohydrates may have a favorable impact on the skeleton in healthy older men and women (3).<br /><br />References Return to TOC<br />1. Brown, E.C., R.A. Disilvestro, A. Babaknia, and S.T. Devor. Soy versus whey protein bars: Effects on exercise training impact on lean body mass and antioxidant status. Nutr J. 3:22 2004.<br /><br />2. Dangin, M., Y. Boirie, C. Garcia-Rodenas, P. Gachon, J. Fauquant, P. Callier, O. Ballevre, and B. Beaufrere. The digestion rate of protein is an independent regulating factor of postprandial protein retention. Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 280:E340–E348. 2001. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />3. Dawson-Hughes, B., S.S. Harris, H. Rasmussen, L. Song, and G.E. Dallal. Effect of dietary protein supplements on calcium excretion in healthy older men and women. J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 89:1169–1173. 2004. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />4. Deibert, P., D. Konig, A. Schmidt-Trucksaess, K.S. Zaenker, I. Frey, U. Landmann, and A. Berg. Weight loss without losing muscle mass in pre-obese and obese subjects induced by a high-soy-protein diet. Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord. 28:1349–1352. 2004. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />5. Flakoll, P.J., T. Judy, K. Flinn, C. Carr, and S. Flinn. Postexercise protein supplementation improves health and muscle soreness during basic military training in marine recruits. J. Appl. Physiol. 96:951–956. 2004. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />6. Lands, L.C., V.L. Grey, and A.A. Smountas. Effect of supplementation with a cysteine donor on muscular performance. J. Appl. Physiol. 87:1381–1385. 1999. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />7. Lemon, P.W. Effects of exercise on dietary protein requirements. Int. J. Sport Nutr. 8:426–447. 1998. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />8. Lemon, P.W., J.M. Berardi, and E.E. Noreen. The role of protein and amino acid supplements in the athlete's diet: Does type or timing of ingestion matter?. Curr. Sports Med. Rep. 1:214–221. 2002. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />9. Levenhagen, D.K., C. Carr, M.G. Carlson, D.J. Maron, M.J. Borel, and P.J. Flakoll. Postexercise protein intake enhances whole-body and leg protein accretion in humans. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc. 34:828–837. 2002. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />10. Nikawa, T., M. Ikemoto, T. Sakai, M. Kano, T. Kitano, T. Kawahara, S. Teshima, K. Rokutan, and K. Kishi. Effects of a soy protein diet on exercise-induced muscle protein catabolism in rats. Nutrition. 18:490–495. 2002. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />11. Poortmans, J.R., and O. Dellalieux. Do regular high protein diets have potential health risks on kidney function in athletes?. Int. J. Sport Nutr. Exerc. Metab. 10:28–38. 2000. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />12. Tipton, K.D., B.B. Rasmussen, S.L. Miller, S.E. Wolf, S.K. Owens-Stovall, B.E. Petrini, and R.R. Wolfe. Timing of amino acid-carbohydrate ingestion alters anabolic response of muscle to resistance exercise. Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab. 281:E197–E206. 2001. Find this article on other systems<br /><br />
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Postby [old] Yukon John » March 2nd, 2006, 11:11 pm

<!--quoteo--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE</b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>We've mentioned that chocolate milk is our favorite post-ride recovery beverage when we've traveled to an event and don't have one of those fancy commercial drinks handy. Maybe it should be our choice all the time. According to the March 6 edition of Sports Illustrated, a new study has found that "athletes who drank chocolate milk after a workout were able to exercise more intensely in a second workout than those who drank commercial sports beverages." The study's coauthor states: "Chocolate milk contains an optimal carbohydrate-to-protein ratio, which is critical for helping refuel tired muscles." Tastes yummy, too!<br /><br />_______________________<br />But, there is a lot of research (the dead rats mentioned above was a new one for me) that suggests that dairy products aren't optimal nutrition. But I've got a cyclist friend (ranked Cat 1 rider) who swears by raw milk (and meat). I'm not taking an advocacy position one way or the other. But I am trying to develop a taste for soy... </td></tr></table><br /><br />Thanks for the info. John! :) I'm going to have to check and see if chocolate soy milk has a similar carb-to-protein ratio! As far as developing a taste for soy. I'm not into drinking straight soy milk, but I really enjoy having it with breakfast. I like to start the day with a big bowl of full grain dry cereal with a sliced banana and a cup of half thawed blueberries covered in plain soy milk. I started with regular plain soy milk, now I have unsweetened. I'm trying to stay lightweight so I figure why add the extra suger when it tastes fine without it. It comes out to about 34 grams of protein, so I've already got about half of what I need for the day, not to mention lots of calcium. Tofu has gotten a bad name with many people, but I've got some really good recipies if your interested in trying some? How about tofu jerky, good stuff :D . <br /><br />I wouldn't mind talking to you some time about cycling. What do you think about having a cycling thread similar to the running thread in the general category? I'd like to pick peoples brains about workouts they like for different terrains, types of race, etc. and lots of other topics.
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Postby [old] Yukon John » March 2nd, 2006, 11:35 pm

<br />Thanks for the info slowcheetch. It's interesting the comparison with soy protein and whey. Since I eat a fair amount of soy, that is nice to see. I wonder about your source though "Strength and Conditioning Journal". There is a ton of research out there and just about any belief a person has about nutrition can be backed by someones research, especially if the research was funded by special interest groups. When they talked about suplimenting with protein, I wonder what the test subjects were normally consuming. The abstract doesn't tell? Below it mentions going from .78-1.55 grams. I would think that if you are only getting .78 grams / kg. that it would be a good idea to either suppliment or better yet, examine your diet. That seems very low to me. Sometime these studies are done on university students. When I was at school, there were I would think, a large portion of students who didn't eat well. So increasing there protein in diets that are poor would show gains in muscle mass, but then so would getting your protein through a healthy diet. Being a vegan, many would think that getting enough protein would be an issue. For me with eating lots of soy, whole grains, legumes and nuts, it's not an issue at all. I'm actually on the high end of acceptable limits! <br /><br />Quote "increasing protein intake from 0.78 to 1.55 grams of protein daily per kilogram of body weight with meat supplements in combination with reducing carbohydrate intake did not alter urine calcium excretion, but was associated with higher circulating levels of IGF-I, a bone growth factor, and lowered levels of urinary N-telopeptide, a marker of bone resorption (3).[/quote]"<br /><br />In the research that I looked at, the urine calcium excretion increased as the level of protein levels increased. I'm not sure what the exact amount of protein intake should be, whether it is 1.2 grams or 1.8 grams, but knowing several people who live with esteoperosis, I personally wouldn't want to gamble with pumping protein :? .
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Postby [old] george nz » March 2nd, 2006, 11:49 pm

Ben at your age, train lots, eat lots (especially complex carbs), lots of fruit and veges, and drink your milk and plenty of it; you will get all you need.<br /><br />Save your money for when you need it !!!<br /><br /><br />George
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Postby [old] razorfizh » March 3rd, 2006, 1:23 pm

<!--quoteo(post=58027:date=Mar 1 2006, 07:26 PM:name=Yukon John)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Yukon John @ Mar 1 2006, 07:26 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'><br /> The average person needs .8 g per kg per day. Endurance training increase their protein needs to about 1 to 1.2 g per kg per day, well above the RDA. <br /> </td></tr></table><br /><br />Can that be right? I weigh 100Kg - so i'd need 100-120 grams of protein every day!<br />Looking at basic stuff I eat:<br />Bread: 6 grams/slice (guess 6 pieces / day * 6 = 36)<br />Yogurt: 2 grams/cup ... times 2 = 4 grams<br />cereal: 5 grams incl. milk (times 2 servings) = 10 grams<br />OJ/Gatoraide/etc: hardly anything . Tropicana=2, Gatorade=0<br /><br />Add a healthy dinner in and sandwich fixings in with the bread I eat, perhaps I could account for another 30-40 grams - which barely makes it. <br /><br />Point is - if this is the RDA, then for some of us heavyweights, the typical diet just doesn't cover it. Its either we need to make a more conscious effort to pick more high protein foods, or supplement with protein drinks, right? Given this info, I'm certain that there are days I have where I don't make the 100 grams with my diet - and I am trying to eat healthy (and stay on a budget :wink: <br /><br />Cheers,<br />Troy
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Postby [old] Yukon John » March 3rd, 2006, 3:36 pm

[quote name='razorfizh' date='Mar 3 2006, 09:23 AM' post='58306']<br />[quote name='Yukon John' post='58027' date='Mar 1 2006, 07:26 PM']<br /><br /> The average person needs .8 g per kg per day. Endurance training increase their protein needs to about 1 to 1.2 g per kg per day, well above the RDA. <br />[/quote]<br /><br />
Can that be right? I weigh 100Kg - so i'd need 100-120 grams of protein every day!<br />Looking at basic stuff I eat:<br />Bread: 6 grams/slice (guess 6 pieces / day * 6 = 36)<br />Yogurt: 2 grams/cup ... times 2 = 4 grams<br />cereal: 5 grams incl. milk (times 2 servings) = 10 grams<br />OJ/Gatoraide/etc: hardly anything . Tropicana=2, Gatorade=0<br /><br />Add a healthy dinner in and sandwich fixings in with the bread I eat, perhaps I could account for another 30-40 grams - which barely makes it. <br /><br />Point is - if this is the RDA, then for some of us heavyweights, the typical diet just doesn't cover it. Its either we need to make a more conscious effort to pick more high protein foods, or supplement with protein drinks, right? Given this info, I'm certain that there are days I have where I don't make the 100 grams with my diet - and I am trying to eat healthy (and stay on a budget :wink: <br /><br />Cheers,<br />Troy
<br /><br />Hi Troy, I'll again state that I'm not a nutrition expert. It is an interest of mine and I've taken a few university classes on it, but seeing a dietician or going through some good nutritional software is a good idea (kind of fun too :) ) Saying that, I did a little number crunching and you're probably getting more grams of protein then you realize. Numbers vary, but most of the stuff I've looked at from reputable places say that 10-20% of your calories should come from protein (probably 20% if your involved with endurance activites.) I don't know how much you eat, but lets say that it's 2500KCalories/day. Now, please check my math, it's not one of my strengths :roll: . 20% equals 500Kcalories from protein. One gram of protein = 4 Kcalories. 500 divided by 4 = 125 grams per day. It sounds like a lot, but if you are eating 2500 Kcalories/day of varied foods then you are going to get that much protein. If you eat a typical north american diet, you're probably getting 2-3 times that amount. If you're following Dr. Atkins advice, god help you :P . Side point, pumping protein didn't help him :( .<br /><br />
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