What Times Are Needed To Be Recruited For College?

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Postby [old] Rate35 » February 8th, 2006, 10:52 pm

<!--QuoteBegin-starboardrigged1seat+Feb 20 2005, 12:47 AM--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(starboardrigged1seat @ Feb 20 2005, 12:47 AM)</b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'><!--QuoteEBegin-->Try breaking 6:40 for 2k and 21:30 for 6k.  Then win one of the following.  Stotesbury.  SRA's.  US Rowing Youth Innvitational.  Head of the Charles.  Jr. Worlds.  Worlds.  The Olympics.  You'll be doing alright. <br /> </td></tr></table><br /><br /><br />you forgot CSSRA (Canadian Secondary School Rowing Association) Regatta, the canadian high school championships, and also the Royal Canadian Henley Regatta. The competition for most events you see at SRAA is weak compared to CSSRA.
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Postby [old] jbell » February 11th, 2006, 11:25 pm

So what would be a "good" time for a heavy weight. Lightweight isnt gonna happen for me, so I gotta focus on heavy weight. When I went to the yale camp they said most heavy weights should be at or below 6:30. I'm only in 10th grade, so I think in 2 1/2yrs I can drop ~30sec.
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Postby [old] dougsurf » February 13th, 2006, 12:28 am

<!--quoteo(post=21656:date=Mar 15 2005, 05:01 PM:name=Number Six)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Number Six @ Mar 15 2005, 05:01 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>I just Read a good BLOG on this exact subject located at www.gorow.com<br /><br />It is written by Xeno Muller<br /> </td></tr></table><br />I added a testamony to that blog. I know of a U. that has a freshman squad who's top boat is under 6:10 and 2nd boat under 6:20., just to depress you more. As a lightweight, you'll rank much higher in a program that actually has a lightweight program, which many, perhaps most, don't. Otherwise, you really have to think about whether you wish to row with the best team, but rank lower and possibly not even race, or be a bigger fish at a smaller school. Or just pull a 6:20 or better.<br /><br />- Doug
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Postby [old] ljwagner » February 17th, 2006, 6:32 pm

You'll definitely raise your score with an adequate warmup of your rowing muscles, if you haven't been. <br /><br />10-15 minutes of medium non-tiring cardio folllowed by a few minutes rest time.
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Postby [old] mpukita » February 17th, 2006, 7:14 pm

<!--quoteo(post=55365:date=Feb 8 2006, 09:52 PM:name=Rate35)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Rate35 @ Feb 8 2006, 09:52 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'><!--QuoteBegin-starboardrigged1seat+Feb 20 2005, 12:47 AM--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(starboardrigged1seat @ Feb 20 2005, 12:47 AM)</b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'><!--QuoteEBegin-->Try breaking 6:40 for 2k and 21:30 for 6k.  Then win one of the following.  Stotesbury.  SRA's.  US Rowing Youth Innvitational.  Head of the Charles.  Jr. Worlds.  Worlds.  The Olympics.  You'll be doing alright.<br /><div align="right"> </div><br /> </td></tr></table><br /><br /><br />you forgot CSSRA (Canadian Secondary School Rowing Association) Regatta, the canadian high school championships, and also the Royal Canadian Henley Regatta. The competition for most events you see at SRAA is weak compared to CSSRA.<br /> </td></tr></table><br /><br />Rate:<br /><br />Do you row for Ridley?<br /><br />-- MP
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Postby [old] jbell » March 5th, 2006, 8:18 pm

What are some good heavyweight time for college?? I'm at 165 lbs currently (166.6 to be exact) and dont see Lightweight as happening unless I magically lose 10lbs of fat somehow. My current 2k/6k times are 6:57.7/22:52.0. When I went to the yale camp, some of the coaches said sub 6:30/sub 21min were good times for a heavyweight male. Anyone want to clarify that?
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Postby [old] Peter S » March 5th, 2006, 8:50 pm

<!--quoteo(post=58563:date=Mar 5 2006, 07:18 PM:name=jbell)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(jbell @ Mar 5 2006, 07:18 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>What are some good heavyweight time for college?? I'm at 165 lbs currently (166.6 to be exact) and dont see Lightweight as happening unless I magically lose 10lbs of fat somehow. My current 2k/6k times are 6:57.7/22:52.0. When I went to the yale camp, some of the coaches said sub 6:30/sub 21min were good times for a heavyweight male. Anyone want to clarify that?<br /> </td></tr></table><br />Just remember college heavyweight goes up to 160 with a 155 average so I could possibly see you rowing as a lightweight in college. I personally had a chance to do that but went with an open program eventhough I'm a junior lightweight. I just think to myself ergs don't float and it's all in the technique and seat racing, with only about 25-30% of a boating decision comes from erging in my opinion. While I was only a 22:02 6k, I was able to beat out a kid who was a 21:12 6k, which is a perfect example.
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Postby [old] Almostflipped » March 6th, 2006, 4:44 pm

JBell, I'm going to have to agree that you are not likely to be a lightweight in college. Certaintly not a natural one. Have no fear, follow your head coach's training program and you will get fast. The most important aspect of this however will be your "off-season". The winter and summer are key. You should at least stay active through that time period, the entire period. Run, bike, swim, erg, whatever. But don't think one week at a rowing camp qualifies as training. Talk to your current senior class, recent alum, and head coach if you want a better snap shot of college erg times.<br /><br />And as an opinion, though I admit I could be wrong, sub-6:30 is what you want for tier 1 programs. Depending on the school you can probably walk on with slower times, but the odds of being "recruited" goes down.
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Postby [old] jbell » March 6th, 2006, 7:12 pm

<!--quoteo(post=58568:date=Mar 5 2006, 07:50 PM:name=Peter S)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Peter S @ Mar 5 2006, 07:50 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'><!--quoteo(post=58563:date=Mar 5 2006, 07:18 PM:name=jbell)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(jbell @ Mar 5 2006, 07:18 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>What are some good heavyweight time for college?? I'm at 165 lbs currently (166.6 to be exact) and dont see Lightweight as happening unless I magically lose 10lbs of fat somehow. My current 2k/6k times are 6:57.7/22:52.0. When I went to the yale camp, some of the coaches said sub 6:30/sub 21min were good times for a heavyweight male. Anyone want to clarify that?<br /> </td></tr></table><br />Just remember college heavyweight goes up to 160 with a 155 average so I could possibly see you rowing as a lightweight in college. I personally had a chance to do that but went with an open program eventhough I'm a junior lightweight. I just think to myself ergs don't float and it's all in the technique and seat racing, with only about 25-30% of a boating decision comes from erging in my opinion. While I was only a 22:02 6k, I was able to beat out a kid who was a 21:12 6k, which is a perfect example.<br /> </td></tr></table><br />I realized that college lightweights go to 160, but I still think its gonna be hard to sty at 160. My technique is OK, theres just a couple little things I'm having a hard time grasping (keeping arms completely straight during recovery, etc). <br /><!--quoteo(post=58642:date=Mar 6 2006, 03:44 PM:name=Almostflipped)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Almostflipped @ Mar 6 2006, 03:44 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>JBell, I'm going to have to agree that you are not likely to be a lightweight in college. Certaintly not a natural one. Have no fear, follow your head coach's training program and you will get fast. The most important aspect of this however will be your "off-season". The winter and summer are key. You should at least stay active through that time period, the entire period. Run, bike, swim, erg, whatever. But don't think one week at a rowing camp qualifies as training. Talk to your current senior class, recent alum, and head coach if you want a better snap shot of college erg times.<br /><br />And as an opinion, though I admit I could be wrong, sub-6:30 is what you want for tier 1 programs. Depending on the school you can probably walk on with slower times, but the odds of being "recruited" goes down.<br /> </td></tr></table><br />Yea, I found out the hard way that the summer was important. During last summer all I did was 10min or so at like 27spm. Then came time for 6k's and I was dead. Winter isnt a problem as I have some people to workout with, so the winter I workout alot. <br /><br />Thanks for the info both of you guys.
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Postby [old] dougsurf » March 7th, 2006, 8:14 pm

<!--quoteo(post=58642:date=Mar 6 2006, 12:44 PM:name=Almostflipped)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Almostflipped @ Mar 6 2006, 12:44 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>And as an opinion, though I admit I could be wrong, sub-6:30 is what you want for tier 1 programs. Depending on the school you can probably walk on with slower times, but the odds of being "recruited" goes down.<br /> </td></tr></table><br />I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but my son is in a freshman program this year at a tier 1 shool. The first boat has no one slower than 6:10. 2nd boat mostly under 6:20. What virtually non-existent scholarship money there is, will probably go to 1st boat types. From 6:20 through 6:40 (if you're lightweight) you might get on a list that will ease scholarship requirements somewhat (e.g. get on the in-state scale for grades and gpa instead of the tougher scale for non-residents). And you should consider how much racing you'll actually get to do if you join a school who's 1st & 2nd boats are 10 or 20 seconds faster than you are. You can't catch up once the program starts. Be very wary of coaches telling you it's any easier than this. I think it might've been the Yale coach that gave promises, promises and more to a star rower of ours. So much so that he didn't apply anywhere else. Then he wasn't admitted. <br /><br />Best regards and luck. It's tough out there!<br /><br />- Doug<br />
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Postby [old] jbell » March 7th, 2006, 8:51 pm

What college does your son go to??
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Postby [old] dougsurf » March 7th, 2006, 9:27 pm

<!--quoteo(post=58725:date=Mar 7 2006, 04:51 PM:name=jbell)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(jbell @ Mar 7 2006, 04:51 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>What college does your son go to??<br /> </td></tr></table><br />I've probably leaked some proprietary information, so I'm reluctant to say exactly. But it's one of the normal top few in the nation.
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Postby [old] Neb154 » March 7th, 2006, 11:27 pm

Sub 6:40 is Ivy/Top Lightweight<br />Sub 6:30/6:25 is Ivy/Top Heavyweight<br /><br />Alot of kids from my club get recruited and these seem to be the times. A friend has 6:36 2k for LWT this year and is going to Yale. Another had 6:43 LWT Junior Year @ 150lbs and is at Penn. Something around there should do it and then again, sub 6:30 is a must for heavies. However, once someone gets to college, the times drop significantly, explaining the sub 6:10 average for frosh boats. Once you start really training, its a whole nother world.
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Postby [old] Almostflipped » March 10th, 2006, 4:17 pm

Doug: My question would be though, were they that fast in the fall of their senior years? The athletes ought to continue getting faster through that fall and into the fall of their frosh college year. Another item I would say is that I was thinking in terms of general attention and possible support from a coach. In terms of scholarship you would definitely need to be better than 6:20. <br /><br />A second item I am curious about is how do tier 1's look at athletes from programs known for smaller erg numbers. Some schools do not train year round, as such they do not produce big erg numbers. If they do, then that kid is special and will definitely be looked at. If not though, I know that it is understood and built into the thought process behind recruiting below tier 1. Is it this way at the tier 1 level? An addendum to that though is if you come from a school known for big scores then it would raise a question mark if you did not have one.<br /><br />Like I said before though, talk to the seniors and alumni at your school bell. Most of them are at or heading to Tier 1 and 2 schools. They can tell you specifically what is there. Also, never, never, never, apply to just one school. The coach's job is to get the best rowers and some coaches are more ethical than others in doing so (this is a commentary on recruiting at large). Also no matter what a coach says, they do not have the ultimate say in admissions and admission departments have been known to give coaches positive reads on kids only to turn them down at the actual application process. <u>Until you have your acceptance letter in hand, believe nothing</u>.
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Postby [old] dougsurf » March 11th, 2006, 3:49 am

<!--quoteo(post=58952:date=Mar 10 2006, 12:17 PM:name=Almostflipped)--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE(Almostflipped @ Mar 10 2006, 12:17 PM) </b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'>Doug: My question would be though, were they that fast in the fall of their senior years? The athletes ought to continue getting faster through that fall and into the fall of their frosh college year. Another item I would say is that I was thinking in terms of general attention and possible support from a coach. In terms of scholarship you would definitely need to be better than 6:20. </td></tr></table><br />Most of these 6:10 guys were right there from their first test in the Fall. At that level, it takes all you can give just to stay current, I imagine. Big improvements come only to those starting out fresh, but they start proportionately lower. <br /><br />Modern rowing is quite different than my days 30 years ago when I walked on as a very long haired cigarette smoker, curious about this "mellow" looking sport. I gained 40 lean lbs in one year and Lord knows what my erg improvement would have been if they were around. And with the majority back then being fresh walk on's, my situation wasn't unique. But it's quite a different deal today, with freshmen that are as trained, cut, and refined as Olympians of a few decades ago.<br /><br /><!--quoteo--><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td><div class='genmed'><b>QUOTE</b></div></td></tr><tr><td class='quote'><!--quotec-->A second item I am curious about is how do tier 1's look at athletes from programs known for smaller erg numbers. Some schools do not train year round, as such they do not produce big erg numbers. If they do, then that kid is special and will definitely be looked at. If not though, I know that it is understood and built into the thought process behind recruiting below tier 1. Is it this way at the tier 1 level? An addendum to that though is if you come from a school known for big scores then it would raise a question mark if you did not have one. </td></tr></table><br />You raise a great point, which more in general is that coaches will have a very keen eye on any clues of hidden untapped potential beyond the raw scores. You cite a reasonable example. If a coach thinks that your program was the limitation, then maybe he can do better. Another, speaking of lightweights, is that the ratio of erg score to bodyweight has been a factor in selecting lineups, though I'd regard it as secondary. <br /><br />Also, swinging to the other extreme, walk on recruiting is taken very seriously, looking for that hidden untapped talent. Someone who excelled and obsessed over some track event, or even something like golf, is prized more than someone in the middle rank & file of a rowing program, even with 4 years experience. That experience, speaking of technique, can actually work against you. Often the coach feels he needs to expend extra effort to "de-program" you of your technique, and get in line with his and that of the new team.<br /><br />One high school kid who golfed instead of rowing? Matt Deakins who rowed in the winning Olympic 8 last year, and a host of other international championships, as one example.<br /><br />
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