TimbukTOO Team Room

A member of an indoor rowing team or club? If so, this is the place for you.

Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby rockenmama » March 5th, 2013, 4:15 pm

The Blacksmith wrote:If you're going for distance-do the marathon plan-some of the world record holders use it(Izz pointed me in that direction)
http://fletchersportscience.co.uk/uploa ... 392f41.pdf



Totally depends on if I get the go ahead to start running (highly doubtful since I am still having major balance issue's and I just found out today that the balance issue's are NOT from my spinal cord compression). If I get the go ahead, I'll be doing mostly short. If not and I get the go ahead to do whatever I want on the Erg I will be looking at long distance, so thanks for the link Blacksmith!
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby rockenmama » March 5th, 2013, 4:27 pm

Ok I must be "sick" because after reading the introduction to that plan I REALLY REALLY want to try it! I of course have to get the go ahead from my surgeon and if so I have a feeling I will be marathon training. Thankfully aerobically I'm in AWESOME shape, just gotta make sure my body is up to par for this! Looks very doable. Thanks again Blacksmith!
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby The Blacksmith » March 5th, 2013, 5:53 pm

I figured that being an "ultra-runner" you'd be more in line with that kind of thing.
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby Izzzmeister » March 5th, 2013, 11:40 pm

damselfly wrote:
CONLEJM wrote:And there's probably a Cap'n Izzzmeister Plan; if there isn't, there should be.


I'm fairly certain it's something along the lines of "Row like hell till you puke". :lol: :lol: :lol:

Why stop then?! What kinda wimps are ya?!
I hope you never row without a bucket next to you, and have already learned to hit it on the fly!

Seriously, though, the basics are the same, regardless of sport:
You have to train your aerobic system to grow a few extra miles of capillaries, to use as much of your oxygen intake as possible, and to produce energy from fat stores + oxygen quickly and efficiently - so you do long rows.
You have to train your anaerobic system to efficiently store lots of glycogen in your muscles & glucagon in your liver, not to build up lactic acid too quickly, and to convert that glycogen to useable energy efficiently - so you do tough middle distance rows.
You have to train your neural system to signal your muscles to repeatedly contract at "race pace" or faster, so that your mind can concentrate on strategy during a race, so that you don't strengthen only your slow-twitch muscles, and so that you can sprint at the beginning and end of a race - so you do repeated short intervals or "fartlek" (alternating fast & slow laps) sessions.
You have to train your ATP/CP system (This is your "bottom line" energy system. It's sort of "atomic energy" - the heat/energy is produced by popping a phosphate off of an adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) molecule, leaving it as an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) molecule. Except there's little "atomic waste" - the body uses fuel from fat or glycogen to repair it back to ATP status for the next pop.), the system used for sudden punches, all-out sprints, lifting the front end of the family SUV off of Fluffy, etc. This is so that you can get up to full speed in seconds, and get 10-15 all-out strokes at the beginning instead of 7-8 - so you do very short sprints.
Those are the basics. If you're training for ultras, you might do 2 very long, slow distance (VLSD) rows a week, 2 longs (LSD), 1 endurance row & one sprint session of longer sprints. If you're training for a 500m race, you might do 2 longs, 1 endurance row, 1 long sprint session, 1 or 2 sessions of short sprints.
In other words, these are the basic building blocks, and you need them all no matter what distance you're aiming for - you just weight the pieces in favor of your chosen race length.
Good supplemental activities are weights/resistance training, plyometrics, careful eating, cross-training, stretching, Pilates, and befriending Lance Armstrong.
WARNING: The workout that most correlates with overtraining is the "endurance", "AT", "Anaerobic Threshold", "L2", or whatever they happen to call the workout at which you're going at the effort level where you just barely cover your energy needs with oxygen. These should be done once a week, rarely twice.
The next hardest workouts are the long sprints & the VLSD. You can burn yourself out on those too, because you're again pushing yourself to the limit.
If you only take off one day a week, it should be after your hardest workout and/or after the one that is closest to what you're aiming to achieve. Don't do 2 hard workouts back-to-back, except maybe when you're near the peak of your training cycle. Take an easy week every once in a while (if it's just a little easier, every 4 weeks, but if it's a lot easier, every 13 weeks), and take a full week off once a year. For the faint of heart, you can bike or run during that week off, just not too hard.
As to training specific to rowing...
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby Izzzmeister » March 5th, 2013, 11:46 pm

rockenmama wrote:...My physical therapist has me doing so much core work (to work on my proprioception) that between that and rowing, my 6 pack is getting a lot more definition...

You only have one six-pack in your belly area? Big deal! I have a BUNCH of six-packs in MY belly area! And in order to get more definition, I have them reading the dictionary! So there!
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby rockenmama » March 6th, 2013, 12:05 am

Izzzmeister wrote:
damselfly wrote:
CONLEJM wrote:And there's probably a Cap'n Izzzmeister Plan; if there isn't, there should be.


I'm fairly certain it's something along the lines of "Row like hell till you puke". :lol: :lol: :lol:

Why stop then?! What kinda wimps are ya?!
I hope you never row without a bucket next to you, and have already learned to hit it on the fly!

Seriously, though, the basics are the same, regardless of sport:
You have to train your aerobic system to grow a few extra miles of capillaries, to use as much of your oxygen intake as possible, and to produce energy from fat stores + oxygen quickly and efficiently - so you do long rows.
You have to train your anaerobic system to efficiently store lots of glycogen in your muscles & glucagon in your liver, not to build up lactic acid too quickly, and to convert that glycogen to useable energy efficiently - so you do tough middle distance rows.
You have to train your neural system to signal your muscles to repeatedly contract at "race pace" or faster, so that your mind can concentrate on strategy during a race, so that you don't strengthen only your slow-twitch muscles, and so that you can sprint at the beginning and end of a race - so you do repeated short intervals or "fartlek" (alternating fast & slow laps) sessions.
You have to train your ATP/CP system (This is your "bottom line" energy system. It's sort of "atomic energy" - the heat/energy is produced by popping a phosphate off of an adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) molecule, leaving it as an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) molecule. Except there's little "atomic waste" - the body uses fuel from fat or glycogen to repair it back to ATP status for the next pop.), the system used for sudden punches, all-out sprints, lifting the front end of the family SUV off of Fluffy, etc. This is so that you can get up to full speed in seconds, and get 10-15 all-out strokes at the beginning instead of 7-8 - so you do very short sprints.
Those are the basics. If you're training for ultras, you might do 2 very long, slow distance (VLSD) rows a week, 2 longs (LSD), 1 endurance row & one sprint session of longer sprints. If you're training for a 500m race, you might do 2 longs, 1 endurance row, 1 long sprint session, 1 or 2 sessions of short sprints.
In other words, these are the basic building blocks, and you need them all no matter what distance you're aiming for - you just weight the pieces in favor of your chosen race length.
Good supplemental activities are weights/resistance training, plyometrics, careful eating, cross-training, stretching, Pilates, and befriending Lance Armstrong.
WARNING: The workout that most correlates with overtraining is the "endurance", "AT", "Anaerobic Threshold", "L2", or whatever they happen to call the workout at which you're going at the effort level where you just barely cover your energy needs with oxygen. These should be done once a week, rarely twice.
The next hardest workouts are the long sprints & the VLSD. You can burn yourself out on those too, because you're again pushing yourself to the limit.
If you only take off one day a week, it should be after your hardest workout and/or after the one that is closest to what you're aiming to achieve. Don't do 2 hard workouts back-to-back, except maybe when you're near the peak of your training cycle. Take an easy week every once in a while (if it's just a little easier, every 4 weeks, but if it's a lot easier, every 13 weeks), and take a full week off once a year. For the faint of heart, you can bike or run during that week off, just not too hard.
As to training specific to rowing...


Sounds just like running for the most part. A week off? Seriously? Actually sounds like good advice. Something I never did with running. I did do cut back week every month or so but only if I was running 80-100 miles weekly I rarely took a day off after a race though I did take a day off after my first and only 100. And if you haven't figured it out I'm a hard ass. My true love is running and if I'm able to get back to that I won't have time or energy to worry about the long stuff on the rower. But until then I'm going to kick ass at rowing! (or maybe it will kick my ass )
Last edited by rockenmama on March 6th, 2013, 12:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby rockenmama » March 6th, 2013, 12:07 am

Izzzmeister wrote:
rockenmama wrote:...My physical therapist has me doing so much core work (to work on my proprioception) that between that and rowing, my 6 pack is getting a lot more definition...

You only have one six-pack in your belly area? Big deal! I have a BUNCH of six-packs in MY belly area! And in order to get more definition, I have them reading the dictionary! So there!

LOL! Love it!
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby Izzzmeister » March 6th, 2013, 12:11 am

All hands on deck, bolstered by our new deckhands! 17 of 71 members (24%) logged 148,664 total meters Monday!

Milestones achieved: Adam achieved 2.3M, Pamela pounded 600K!!
Approaching milestones: Cindy in pursuit of 800K (-20,691m), Mike in reach of 700K (-23,397m), Michael M steadily moves towards 450K (-21,178m), Amanda seeks 400K (-19,273m), while Grace M (-2,894m) & mom Meg M (-3,803m) approach 25K in sync!

Posted Meters:
Michael Mc - 18,055 Please make sure you take enough rest days!
Dale C - 16,525 The million mark is in sight!
Jim C - 16,000 Back & rested!
Pamela H - 14,080 Long!
Matthew R - 11,500 Three!

Jeff T - 11,010 That’s four!
John S - 10,117 Strong rowing efforts daily!
Adam M - 8,500 Wow! Just wow! (Already 250K+ more than last year!)
Cindy R - 6,592 Holding her fitness…
Amanda G - 6,460 Fifth row this week!

Lisa H - 6,027 Outdoing herself!
Meg Mc - 5,018 Get your own LogCard…
David R - 5,000 March Madness rows?
Warren F - 5,000 A 5K a day keeps the doctor away!
Mike M - 5,000 Get “Drac” painted on the sides of your C2 box!
Grace Mc - 2,562 This is an amazing workout!
Vince M - 1,218 Building up…
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby Izzzmeister » March 6th, 2013, 12:58 am

rockenmama wrote:...Sounds just like running for the most part. A week off? Seriously? Actually sounds like good advice. Something I never did with running. I did do cut back week every month or so but only if I was running 80-100 miles weekly I rarely took a day off after a race though I did take a day off after my first and only 100...

It IS like running for the most part. I put together a file of articles by legendary running coach Jack Daniels (the Jack Daniels that makes you run faster, not the Jack Daniels that makes you stagger) that I take out and read every once in a while. The differences, which I didn't have time to get to, include things like L4 rowing that the Wolverine Plan includes, the near-obsession with the 2K, the potential muscle imbalances, etc.

The week off is a bit controversial, though some top competitors & coaches swear by it. Jack LaLanne would've had a conniption fit - a WEEK without exercise?! But the potential benefits include: 1) Giving the body the time to repair niggling bruises, pains and stress near-injuries, 2) Psychological vacation helps you come back refreshed, eager, helps avoid burn-out, 3) Lessens chance of frying neural pathways from excessive repetition, 4) Physical vacation helps you attack your training with renewed energy. Some competitors claim that this week helped them reach new plateaus in the next training cycle.

Day off after a race is also a matter of dispute. Ultra-running does real damage to heart muscles - but after a few days, the heart is totally repaired. That's a reason to take a day off. On the other hand, a short run the day after a race often helps recovery for the muscles, gets some of the kinks out. If I was your coach, I'd send you out for a 4-mile run the day after the race, then give you the next day off.
Also remember, as you get older, you need more time for recovery, more days off.
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby CONLEJM » March 6th, 2013, 8:48 am

Izzzmeister wrote:
rockenmama wrote:...My physical therapist has me doing so much core work (to work on my proprioception) that between that and rowing, my 6 pack is getting a lot more definition...

You only have one six-pack in your belly area? Big deal! I have a BUNCH of six-packs in MY belly area! And in order to get more definition, I have them reading the dictionary! So there!


I just have one big ab, and it helps counter-balance my big butt! :shock: No balance problems here! :lol:
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby rockenmama » March 6th, 2013, 9:56 am

Izzzmeister wrote:
rockenmama wrote:...Sounds just like running for the most part. A week off? Seriously? Actually sounds like good advice. Something I never did with running. I did do cut back week every month or so but only if I was running 80-100 miles weekly I rarely took a day off after a race though I did take a day off after my first and only 100...

It IS like running for the most part. I put together a file of articles by legendary running coach Jack Daniels (the Jack Daniels that makes you run faster, not the Jack Daniels that makes you stagger) that I take out and read every once in a while. The differences, which I didn't have time to get to, include things like L4 rowing that the Wolverine Plan includes, the near-obsession with the 2K, the potential muscle imbalances, etc.

The week off is a bit controversial, though some top competitors & coaches swear by it. Jack LaLanne would've had a conniption fit - a WEEK without exercise?! But the potential benefits include: 1) Giving the body the time to repair niggling bruises, pains and stress near-injuries, 2) Psychological vacation helps you come back refreshed, eager, helps avoid burn-out, 3) Lessens chance of frying neural pathways from excessive repetition, 4) Physical vacation helps you attack your training with renewed energy. Some competitors claim that this week helped them reach new plateaus in the next training cycle.

Day off after a race is also a matter of dispute. Ultra-running does real damage to heart muscles - but after a few days, the heart is totally repaired. That's a reason to take a day off. On the other hand, a short run the day after a race often helps recovery for the muscles, gets some of the kinks out. If I was your coach, I'd send you out for a 4-mile run the day after the race, then give you the next day off.
Also remember, as you get older, you need more time for recovery, more days off.


Yep I know who Jack Daniels is. I actually was following some what of one of his plans though I had to tweak it. It helped me break 9 hours for the 50 miler.

I'm "uncoachable" since I can't seem to follow any plan. I'm way too ADHD and like to switch things up alot. I also RARELY get DOMS so for the most part I'm always raring to go. I am coaching my 11 year old son and he always takes the second day off after a race.
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby damselfly » March 6th, 2013, 1:15 pm

Concept2 reminds us that spring cleaning isn't just for rugs and furniture!! (I'm not sure I qualify as an "institutional user", but I sure could be an "institutionalized user"!! :P)

Concept2 on Facebook wrote:
A great reminder from Row New York: keep your erg in good repair with some spring cleaning and daily maintenance. And it can be fun! Check out how here: http://www.concept2.com/service/indoor-rowers/model-d/maintenance

Image
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Try not! Do, or do not! There is no "try". -- Yoda
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby rockenmama » March 6th, 2013, 1:17 pm

Dang it's a small world. I was checking out the members of this group and my old dentist from the Pocono's is a member. I don't think he's active here anymore but he was in 2010. Mike E is his name
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby damselfly » March 6th, 2013, 1:30 pm

rockenmama wrote:Dang it's a small world. I was checking out the members of this group and my old dentist from the Pocono's is a member. I don't think he's active here anymore but he was in 2010. Mike E is his name


Yeah, it's been a while since we've seen any meters from Doc Mike. He has had some back trouble on and off.
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Re: TimbukTOO Team Room

Postby TMike » March 6th, 2013, 1:56 pm

Izzzmeister wrote:
damselfly wrote:
CONLEJM wrote:And there's probably a Cap'n Izzzmeister Plan; if there isn't, there should be.


I'm fairly certain it's something along the lines of "Row like hell till you puke". :lol: :lol: :lol:

Why stop then?! What kinda wimps are ya?!
I hope you never row without a bucket next to you, and have already learned to hit it on the fly!



pukin' in a Bucket is so passe
the EDGE of the trailer is my forte
row if you can
puke if you must
but for me.... its 10K or BUST!

Ok, enuff of that...I'll quit while I'm ahead. :roll: :roll: :roll: :lol:

greetings all ----> from Gila Bend, AZ... Again.
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