OK to row every day?

Rowing for weight loss or weight control? Start here.

Re: OK to row every day?

Postby Cayenne » March 26th, 2016, 6:07 pm

Sekitori,

You make excellent points and I can't say any of them are wrong.

I have always thought that "The Beatles" was a terrible name for a musical group. :D

Hope you enjoy the book and, if you do, spread the word. So many people stand to benefit !

(BTW, if you like it, why not share your suggestions with Mr. Ordway? Perhaps a future edition could be re-titled in the hope of reaching a broader audience. Of course, the message, not the title, is what really matters. I mean, even if the Beatles had stayed with "The Quarrymen" or "Johnny and Moondogs" as their group name, their music would have been just as great. FWIW, even though I personally like the title, "Row daily, etc..." if the book was re-named, "Move your a$$ back and forth...alot !" well, who knows...?)
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby jla956 » May 3rd, 2016, 9:25 am

Dittos to the RowPro recommendation, plus there are plenty of other 2nd party recommendations on the C2 website - http://www.concept2.com/service/softwar ... are#rowpro

I've been rowing on a C2 for almost 30 years and there are times that you just get "burnt out" but the programs like RowPro are a game-changer - they will keep you engaged and are fun too. I had decades of just rowing to stay in shape. I would set goals to challenge me but with RowPro you can workout smart with very customized programs. I find that I can work out for shorter periods of time and get far better results that are measurable. You're using the C2 WOD which is good and breaks the monotony, but RowPro has built in exercise programs specific to what you need. Take a look at it or some of the other programs that are available.

Regarding your original question as to how often you should row - let your body tell you that. I have a Polar HRM and I also use that with the SweetBeat program (www.sweetwaterhrv.com) which measures your (HRV) Heart Rate Variability. I get instant feedback every morning when I take a 2 minute test to see what my HRV is and the program will tell you whether it's OK to workout or if you should skip a day. I use it during my rowing to measure results and also for a two minute period afterwards to measure recovery.

All I can say is that this program is "spot on" when it comes to giving you exact feedback. Just Google Heart Rate Variability or visit the SweetBeat website for a good explanation of what HRV is and how it impacts you. Good luck and enjoy your Erg!
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby grahamcawood » January 8th, 2018, 8:43 pm

Yes! Very OK to row daily. Just another daily function - like breakfast.
I do a 30 minute erg daily, at 25spm, 1:1 work:recovery ratio, 2 breaths per stroke. Try for the same perceived effort . About 3 years ago I started getting monthly split jumps from 2.03 to about 2.20. This gradually dropped over the next month, and then jumped again.I drew a graph of these splits and showed it to my doctor. This led quickly to 5x bypass surgery. After 3 weeks I was back on the erg for 30 minutes daily, starting at 3.05, and not pulling beyond the knees to safeguard the sternum. Back to 2,05 now. I'm 70.
Thank you Doctors, and thank you erg for highlighting my problem!!!
Have fun!
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby Ombrax » January 10th, 2018, 3:39 am

I think it all depends on whether your mind and your body can take it.

In my case my right shoulder needs a day to rest from "normal" workouts (I have a problem with the labrum) and two days rest after very hard workouts. If I took it easy I probably could row everyday, but part of the idea of exercising is to push yourself and improve, so I have a hard time just doing "easy rows." Lately I've been rowing either every other day or 3x a week, depending on how things fall out in a given week.

Good Luck
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby Dangerscouse » January 10th, 2018, 8:50 am

I agree with Ombrax, it's a very subjective decision. You will know fairly quickly what is sustainable for you as your mind and body will soon tell you to rest if you need to.

Personally I need 2 days rest but I also do a 45min spin class and dynamic hot pilates every week so i need to have some sort of rest as I get up at 4:30am for my rowing / weights.
44 Years Old; 6' 4"; 95kg; Liverpool, England 2k= 6:45; 5k= 17:29; 6k= 21:54; 10k= 36:21 30mins= 8,242m 60mins= 16,317m HM= 1:18:40; FM= 2:49:39; 50k= 3:28:18; 75k=5:29:15; 100k= 7:52:44; 12hrs = 153km

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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby Steve1960VA » January 10th, 2018, 5:13 pm

grahamcawood wrote:Yes! Very OK to row daily. Just another daily function - like breakfast.
I do a 30 minute erg daily, at 25spm, 1:1 work:recovery ratio, 2 breaths per stroke. Try for the same perceived effort . About 3 years ago I started getting monthly split jumps from 2.03 to about 2.20. This gradually dropped over the next month, and then jumped again.I drew a graph of these splits and showed it to my doctor. This led quickly to 5x bypass surgery. After 3 weeks I was back on the erg for 30 minutes daily, starting at 3.05, and not pulling beyond the knees to safeguard the sternum. Back to 2,05 now. I'm 70.
Thank you Doctors, and thank you erg for highlighting my problem!!!
Have fun!


A very interesting and inspiring story. Thanks for resurrecting this thread and for posting. After reading through this thread I'd planned on quoting some other posts, but then I noticed how old this thread is, and decided against. Some of those folks might not visit here anymore...

There are, though, a number of interesting points raised in this thread, and there's one particularly well-written post that makes lots of good points. General sedentary behavior by the populace of most first-world countries, the "Row daily, breathe deeply..." book, etc.

As for myself, now that the US NCAA football championship game is behind us, I'm trying to get started erging faithfully, again. Made a modest effort early this AM. I really think it's important for me to do it daily, or very nearly daily (miss a single day here and there). Though I was never very capable, I think I was most capable when I was working hard nearly every day.
Male. Virginia, USA. Born 1960. 6'4" (1.93 m). 268 pounds (122 kg). C2 Model D, PM 5.

Am erging for fitness. Weight loss OK if it comes.
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby sekitori » January 10th, 2018, 10:06 pm

To me, rowing every day became not just a source of exercise but an obsession. At one time, I rowed every day for well over three years for between a half hour and an hour a session. No matter how I felt, I continued and didn't miss a day. For some strange reason, this streak became unusually important to me. I was so obsessed with it continuing that I didn't want it to ever stop. It got to a point that even if a workout wasn't that good, it was still okay because I completed it. I began confusing quantity with quality. Then it occurred to me that I really should take an occasional day off to get some much needed rest. It became a matter of extending the streak even longer or doing something that I thought would benefit my health. One day, I chose not to row and that day was hell because I knew the streak was finally over. The next day, I had a very good workout because that day off helped me more than I could ever imagine. Since then, I row for six days a week and take one day completely off from any exercise at all. Taking a day off was an excellent decision and I never regretted making it. As far as I'm concerned, it's perfectly okay to take a break from exercise once a week. But when I do work out, I try to make it count.

A couple of years ago, a book called "Row Daily, Breathe Deeply, Live Better" was mentioned in this discussion group. The main idea was that in order to gain the most out of rowing, you had to do it every single day and that taking a day off could somehow prove to be at least somewhat harmful. I finally read the book and while its aim is admirable, the advice given often seems ridiculous. I learned that this book was published by iUniverse which is a vanity press where the author pays to have his or her book published. I can see why no regular publisher would want anything to do with it.

Here are a few quotes to show what I mean:
“The book is not intended to motivate you”. It was the most motivational book I ever read. That motivation was totally misplaced but it was still present throughout the book.
“Find or buy a rowing machine today and start rowing now”. An overly simplistic statement. It assumes you can get on a rower having absolutely no experience or prior instruction and start using it successfully right away. No mention of learning how to use it first.
“Planning to exercise six days a week will lead to five or four or three". Not if you're disciplined enough to keep at six days per week. And if you're not, working out for three or four days a week is a lot better than not working out at all.
“You should not expect to come back after a day off performing at the same level you achieved before”. That's true. After a day off, your performance should be even better. :-)
“Your starting point should be that taking a day off is the primary error to avoid”. That's the best "error" I ever made.
"The essential point is to row every day. There is no required level of skill or effort”. Wrong. As I stated previously, you have to learn how to use an erg properly first. If you don't, you'll either get injured or get so frustrated that you'll give up. And even if you do know how to use it, if you don't exert much effort, you will acccomplish very little.
“See how a high number of consecutive days you can reach each month and compare that over time”. That makes no sense at all.

Here is the author's view about buying a used rower:
"If you wish to buy a used, older machine, you can fix it yourself”. Not unless you're a Carl Watts clone. It's the same as saying anyone who buys a used car should be a mechanic.

Finally, here are some of his definitions. These are the author's exact words:
“Rower--Someone who rows”. I believe we learned descriptions like that in the first grade.
“Handle--The portion of an oar or rowing machine where the rower places his or her hands”. No comment.
“Seat”—The small padded platform on wheels on which you sit”. I agree that on a rower, you sit on the seat. What I do not agree with is the "padded" part. Some seats are not well padded or even padded at all. Unfortunately, they include seats on the C2.

I've wanted to state my opinions about this book for a long time and I finally have the chance to do so. If you want a highly motivational book about rowing that doesn't make much sense, this is the one to get. Sixteen bucks from Amazon where it got a surprising rating of 4.1 stars. Maybe I'm missing something. Or maybe the reviewers were friends and relatives of the author.
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby Ripples » January 19th, 2018, 12:01 am

sekitori wrote:
A couple of years ago, a book called "Row Daily, Breathe Deeply, Live Better" was mentioned in this discussion group. The main idea was that in order to gain the most out of rowing, you had to do it every single day and that taking a day off could somehow prove to be at least somewhat harmful. I finally read the book and while its aim is admirable, the advice given often seems ridiculous. I learned that this book was published by iUniverse which is a vanity press where the author pays to have his or her book published. I can see why no regular publisher would want anything to do with it.

Here are a few quotes to show what I mean:
“The book is not intended to motivate you”. It was the most motivational book I ever read. That motivation was totally misplaced but it was still present throughout the book.
“Find or buy a rowing machine today and start rowing now”. An overly simplistic statement. It assumes you can get on a rower having absolutely no experience or prior instruction and start using it successfully right away. No mention of learning how to use it first.
“Planning to exercise six days a week will lead to five or four or three". Not if you're disciplined enough to keep at six days per week. And if you're not, working out for three or four days a week is a lot better than not working out at all.
“You should not expect to come back after a day off performing at the same level you achieved before”. That's true. After a day off, your performance should be even better. :-)
“Your starting point should be that taking a day off is the primary error to avoid”. That's the best "error" I ever made.
"The essential point is to row every day. There is no required level of skill or effort”. Wrong. As I stated previously, you have to learn how to use an erg properly first. If you don't, you'll either get injured or get so frustrated that you'll give up. And even if you do know how to use it, if you don't exert much effort, you will acccomplish very little.
“See how a high number of consecutive days you can reach each month and compare that over time”. That makes no sense at all.

Here is the author's view about buying a used rower:
"If you wish to buy a used, older machine, you can fix it yourself”. Not unless you're a Carl Watts clone. It's the same as saying anyone who buys a used car should be a mechanic.

Finally, here are some of his definitions. These are the author's exact words:
“Rower--Someone who rows”. I believe we learned descriptions like that in the first grade.
“Handle--The portion of an oar or rowing machine where the rower places his or her hands”. No comment.
“Seat”—The small padded platform on wheels on which you sit”. I agree that on a rower, you sit on the seat. What I do not agree with is the "padded" part. Some seats are not well padded or even padded at all. Unfortunately, they include seats on the C2.

I've wanted to state my opinions about this book for a long time and I finally have the chance to do so. If you want a highly motivational book about rowing that doesn't make much sense, this is the one to get. Sixteen bucks from Amazon where it got a surprising rating of 4.1 stars. Maybe I'm missing something. Or maybe the reviewers were friends and relatives of the author.



Thanks for that review. Was about to buy the book ($6 for the Kindle version), then read the quotes you noted. I'll pass and continue being motivated by goals I've set for this summer on the water.
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby swingshiftworker » January 29th, 2018, 8:36 pm

After a year of just occasional use, I started to row daily beginning 3 months ago.

I take a day off here and there but am rowing 10k meters a day (most days) and 5k meters when I'm not "feeling it." If I feel "tired," I just take the day off but that haven't occurred very often because I am not rowing to exhaustion; just at a rate that will get me to sweat a bit but still allow me to talk if need be and not feel fatigued afterward. For me this is currently 700-750 cal/hr at 28 spm for only 5x1k, 4x2.5k or 1k+2x2k meter sets. To reduce the stress, I rest 2-5 mins bet sets.

Every once in awhile, I will go all out and do a tabata 8x20 sec routine or do 500,1k or 2k meters as fast as I can w/o "killing myself." I won't win any races but at 67 I can do a sub-2 min 500m split rowing at a rate of 950-1000 cal/hr (200+ watts) at 30 spm. However, I can't do this type of rowing too often or I would have to take more rest between days to recover.

Just rowed over 1Million Lifetime meters doing this (after 18 months of C2 ownership) and should top 1.3M meters for the current rowing season ending April 30, 2018. Not bad considering I just started rowing this much in November 2017. My goal will be to row 250k meters/month(which I've been averaging for the past 2 months) for a total of 3Million meters in the 2018-2019 season.
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby Dangerscouse » January 30th, 2018, 4:19 pm

@ swingshift, very impressive effort
44 Years Old; 6' 4"; 95kg; Liverpool, England 2k= 6:45; 5k= 17:29; 6k= 21:54; 10k= 36:21 30mins= 8,242m 60mins= 16,317m HM= 1:18:40; FM= 2:49:39; 50k= 3:28:18; 75k=5:29:15; 100k= 7:52:44; 12hrs = 153km

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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby swingshiftworker » March 5th, 2018, 2:42 am

I have been rowing 10k meters/day (with occasional rest days here and there) for the past 4 months and plan to do so indefinitely. Hasn't been a problem for me. It only takes me a little over an hour a day to do this and I do not fatigued or tired because I do. However, I generally only row at a "moderate" rate each day; enough to break a sweat but not so much that I have to catch my breath or am unable to speak while rowing.

I am currently averaging about 230k meters/month. My personal goal to to reach 2 million by the end of this rowing year on April 30th, which will require me to row 600k meters more in March & April. Only rowed about 400k meters all of last year; my 1st year of C2 ownership. If I reach the 2 million meter mark by April 30th, my goal will be to then row 250k meters/month for a total of 3 million meters in the 2018/2019 rowing year for a lifetime total of 5 million meters.
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby burritomike » March 6th, 2018, 4:59 pm

Ombrax wrote:If I took it easy I probably could row everyday, but part of the idea of exercising is to push yourself and improve, so I have a hard time just doing "easy rows."

The "easy rows" you mention might make excellent active recovery sessions on those days your shoulder needs a break!
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby Ombrax » March 6th, 2018, 7:25 pm

burritomike wrote:The "easy rows" you mention might make excellent active recovery sessions on those days your shoulder needs a break!


Agreed, that would be a good thing, and if I had more time I would probably do so.
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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby jamesg » March 7th, 2018, 2:28 am

Intuitively, I think that I should do other things on certain days each week, but I don't really have another activity that I like and I enjoy the rower. Open to any and all thoughts/advice.


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Re: OK to row every day?

Postby burritomike » March 7th, 2018, 3:00 pm

curlyrower wrote:Hi -- Totally new to rowing. Got a Concept2 as a 50th birthday present. I'm a female in good health who would like to lose 10 pounds and firm up. Is it ok to row every day? I mostly do the WOD sent by Concept2. Usually the light or medium workout. But I definitely don't overexert myself. Intuitively, I think that I should do other things on certain days each week, but I don't really have another activity that I like and I enjoy the rower. Open to any and all thoughts/advice. Thank you.

Keeping the intensity in mind like previous posters mentioned, I say you row every day. Weight loss, however, definitely is mostly in what you eat. I am a proponent of the Zone Diet, it works really well for me. When I am strict about my food intake the pounds melt off, swelling and inflammation in my joints goes way down, and after a couple weeks there is a noticeable difference in the way I feel and my sleep patterns. Some folks don't like the Zone Diet, but it works for me. If you are really looking for something else to do besides rowing to firm you up and get rid of some weight, spend time researching food and make some changes in the types and amounts of foods you eat.
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