Any Low-Carb rowers out there?

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Re: Any Low-Carb rowers out there?

Postby skiffrace » February 1st, 2016, 3:20 pm

How about the long-term effects of the low-carb diet?
Not the next month 2K, or next year marathon, but say, 10, 20, 30 years from now.
Time when you are in your 60s, 70s or older, and maintaining overall good health is far more important that 'losing 20 lbs'
Any well researched, scientific *DATA* on the subject (as opposed to 'opinions')
?
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Re: Any Low-Carb rowers out there?

Postby ArmandoChavezUNC » February 2nd, 2016, 12:24 pm

For all those interested in keto diets, I recommend you peruse Lyle McDonald's website, "Body Recomposition." He has written a lot of great articles (and even books) about keto diets and working out.

http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/
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Re: Any Low-Carb rowers out there?

Postby Carl Watts » February 2nd, 2016, 6:02 pm

skiffrace wrote:How about the long-term effects of the low-carb diet?
Not the next month 2K, or next year marathon, but say, 10, 20, 30 years from now.
Time when you are in your 60s, 70s or older, and maintaining overall good health is far more important that 'losing 20 lbs'
Any well researched, scientific *DATA* on the subject (as opposed to 'opinions')
?


Most diets are just that, short term fads that people try for a while, sure they "work" for the short term and get the desired "losing 20 lbs" but are seldom sustainable.

Unless you have food alergies or some medical predisposition and your able to eat pretty much anything you want then you cannot beat a balanced and sustainable food intake.

Also cannot beat just hard exercise, but then thats hard work and sweat, easier to fiddle with your food for some corrective action.
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Age:50 Weight: 100kg Height:183cm Body fat:20%
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Re: Any Low-Carb rowers out there?

Postby hjs » February 3rd, 2016, 4:27 am

Carl Watts wrote:
skiffrace wrote:How about the long-term effects of the low-carb diet?
Not the next month 2K, or next year marathon, but say, 10, 20, 30 years from now.
Time when you are in your 60s, 70s or older, and maintaining overall good health is far more important that 'losing 20 lbs'
Any well researched, scientific *DATA* on the subject (as opposed to 'opinions')
?


Most diets are just that, short term fads that people try for a while, sure they "work" for the short term and get the desired "losing 20 lbs" but are seldom sustainable.

Unless you have food alergies or some medical predisposition and your able to eat pretty much anything you want then you cannot beat a balanced and sustainable food intake.

Also cannot beat just hard exercise, but then thats hard work and sweat, easier to fiddle with your food for some corrective action.


So in other words, If you don,t train pretty serious we all would get fat. :lol: Ofcourse not.

Current eating habbits are still pretty short term, and there have ever been so many overweight people in the world. Proberly a connection.

And no there is serious long term research, which is very rare in the first place. The inuit could be used, they proberly eat very low carb, high fat.
For my training see twitter @Hjsrowing
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Re: Any Low-Carb rowers out there?

Postby skiffrace » February 3rd, 2016, 1:48 pm

Also cannot beat just hard exercise, but then thats hard work and sweat, easier to fiddle with your food for some corrective action.

Truer words were never spoken!
The inuit could be used, they proberly eat very low carb, high fat.

Good point - thank you!
I searched for "Inuits average lifespan"
Results are quite few and not well documented. However, based on limited research evidence, the following observations emerge:
-The recent generations of Inuits are quite sickly and short lived (compared to average Canadian)
However, the introduction of highly processed foods to the Inuit diet may (or may not) be a factor.

-As far as the original Inuits (back from thousands of years ago), the most likely conclusion is that their lives were "nasty, brutish and short", just like everybody else in those days.

This link points to some interesting research about both Inuits and Masai people of Africa - a population that consumes large amount of animal protein (mostly in form of dairy products)
http://nutritionstudies.org/masai-and-i ... oser-look/

Here are some of the more interesting parts:
...50 Masai men and found that they had extensive atherosclerosis. They had disease (coronary intimal thickening) on par with older American men. Over 80% of the men over age 40 had severe fibrosis in their aorta, the main blood vessel from the heart that supplies the rest of the body with blood. Yet there were no heart attacks shown on autopsy and these men still had functional heart vessels without blockages because their vessels had become larger. Researchers thought this might have been related to their rather extreme daily physical activity.


What about Inuits risk of heart disease? It turns out to be a myth so often repeated it just became an unsupported truth. A 2003 paper[5] published by a highly experienced, highly published scientist at the National Institute of Public Health in Greenland, written with his colleagues from Canada, documents many autopsy studies and clinical observations and studies proving that heart disease existed among the Inuit. In fact, in 1940 the “father of epidemiology” in Greenland, Bertelsen, noted heart disease to be quite common, perhaps even more interesting given the young age of the population. He based this on clinical experience and medical officer reports going back for many decades(cited in 5). All told, the 2003 paper found “the hypothesis that mortality from ischemic heart disease is low among the Inuit compared with western populations insufficiently founded.” Further, “…a general statement that mortality from cardiovascular disease is high among the Inuit seems more warranted than the opposite.”[5]


Based on those 2 quotations, one can draw the following conclusion about high-fat, high protein diet: it does lead to severe degenerative changes of the cardiovascular system. Those changes may not lead to massive mortality rates if, and only if the lifestyle of the subjects includes very high amount of daily physical activities. The Masai walk 19 km/day more than us, Inuits (of the past) spent during the summertime many hours kayaking in pursuit of their food.
How does the high-fat/high-protein diet, 45'/day erg user, otherwise usually sedentary person, compare?
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