Open Water Rowing

No, ergs don't yet float, but some of us do, and here's where you get to discuss that other form of rowing.
PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 2nd, 2019, 9:27 am

Yankeerunner wrote:
November 1st, 2019, 2:18 pm
No, that wasn't the worst part. The worst was hearing the comments from the regulars that this was best rowing conditions ever at this race! What? It gets WORSE? I can't say that I thoroughly enjoyed it, but then again I can't say that I won't be back to try again next year. Especially since Anne Hird (Rhode Island rower and erger) has thrown down a challenge.

Highlight of the day was when I put on a borrowed life jacket and commented that I thought chicks might like the look. Immediately a slender, attractive, physically fit woman looked and exclaimed, "Oh, you are so HOT!" It made my day. Then she went out and beat me by some 13 minutes in the race. She was pretty darn hot herself.
Oh yes, it gets worse. Much Worse.

Here's Rick in his hot PFD.

Image

PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 2nd, 2019, 9:29 am

Mother and baby boat.

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PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 2nd, 2019, 9:31 am

Beautiful two person boat on the flooded marsh.

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PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 2nd, 2019, 9:37 am

Getting the dories ready to go.

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PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 2nd, 2019, 9:49 am

Surf Dories. Note the holes to let the water wash out.

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PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 2nd, 2019, 9:51 am

I have some landscape format photos that are too wide to post. I'd appreciate it if someone could PM me with instructions on how to resize them in Google photos.

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Citroen
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by Citroen » November 2nd, 2019, 9:54 am

PaulG wrote:
November 2nd, 2019, 9:51 am
I have some landscape format photos that are too wide to post. I'd appreciate it if someone could PM me with instructions on how to resize them in Google photos.
Install GIMP. That's the cheapskate's version of Paintshop.

PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 3rd, 2019, 2:22 pm

Here's some more: Belle Fast and Selkie

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PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 3rd, 2019, 2:26 pm

Spirit of Westport:

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Crouching Lion and Belle Fast

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PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » November 3rd, 2019, 2:27 pm

Hauling the boats up on the flooded marsh.

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Yankeerunner
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by Yankeerunner » November 9th, 2019, 11:30 am

Cyclist2 wrote:
November 1st, 2019, 7:06 pm
Yankeerunner wrote:
November 1st, 2019, 2:18 pm
I can't say that I thoroughly enjoyed it, but then again I can't say that I won't be back to try again next year.
Hey Rick; You forgot to mention the best part (of the race, not the scenery): Staying upright! Good job! Glad it was more fun than torture and that you'll be back.

I raced in a mixed double this year, and that was one of our primary goals, staying upright. It was definitely a challenge in a couple of races.
Haha. When I first mentioned on facebook that Paul had talked me into this race one of our rowing friends, Anne Hird, assumed that we were going to row a double. When she found out that Paul was sending me out alone she was appalled. But then she too was suitably impressed that I managed to stay upright. B)
55-59: 1:33.5 3:19.2 6:55.7 18:22.0 2:47:26.5
60-64: 1:35.9 3:23.8 7:06.7 18:40.8 2:48:53.6
65-69: 1:38.6 3:31.9 7:19.2 19:26.6 3:02:06.0
70-74: 1:40.2 3:33.4 7:32.6 19:50.5 3:06:36.8
75-76: 1:43.9 3:47.7 7:50.2 20:51.3 3:13:55.7

PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » October 25th, 2021, 11:03 am

After over a year of cancellations of open water races, Rick Bayko (Yankeerunner on the forum) and I participated in the Mighty Merrimack Rowing Race on Oct 23rd hosted by Lowell’s Boat Shop and Museum (http://lowellsboatshop.com/), America’s oldest operating boat shop. The shop is located in Amesbury, Mass, right on the Merrimack River and the race is more of a fun row than a race but if they are keeping time I’m rowing as hard as I can. Most of the participants were in dories or work boats with two pilot gigs, a kayak, and Rick and I in an Alden Starr and Peinert Zephyr respectively. I’ve rowed this race several times and Rick participated once in a dory. There’s a write up of that on this thread.

We loaded up the boats on my car Friday afternoon and Rick and I discussed the course. It starts out downriver into the current and then crosses the Merrimack River near the Whittier Bridge (Route 95). During the crossing you are subject to strong upriver tidal current and you can be swept upriver of the downriver mark. Once you make the turn you look for a steeple upriver over your right shoulder and eventually you will find a navigation buoy over your left shoulder that marks the upriver turn. Then it’s back to the starting line at the boat shop and repeat a second lap. We launched at a boat ramp upriver of the race course and rowed down to the shop noting the location of the upriver buoy. I remarked that it seemed further downstream than usual.

It was somewhat cold and overcast as we took to the water but it soon became clear and warm. I jockeyed my way to the first line at the start and heard a guy in a dory growl to the kayaker, “keep clear, you don’t want to get under our oars.” What a jerk, it’s supposed to be safe and fun. The horn went off and the kayaker soon left him in his wake. I jumped to the lead and was soon crossing the river to the downstream mark. I was ready for the upstream current and compensated for it and rounded the mark without incident. Then it was upriver with the current with the steeple in view. I had a bead on the steeple and kept looking for the nav buoy but just couldn’t find it. Then I remembered my own advice and looked over my left shoulder. There it was, at least 75 m downstream of me. I completely overshot it! Who put it there? I was not informed! I made a wide turn trying to keep my speed up and by the time I reached the buoy Mr. Kayaker and Jeff and Rich, the two best dorymen in New England, had almost caught up with me in their double dory. I rowed hard into the current and soon had a good lead again. Mr. Kayaker in his Chesapeake Designs kayak was too far out in the middle of the river and almost missed passing through the starting line for the start of the second lap. Both of us learned again that navigation is part of the race.

Then it was a little further downstream and crossing of the river. By this time the current had picked up even more and as I was within 20 m of the downstream buoy, I noticed a patch of smooth, fast moving water. My bow hit that patch and within one boat length I was twisted pointing slightly upriver. A few quick pulls on the starboard oar and I was back on course but closer to the buoy than I wanted. After that I put the hammer down going upriver with the tidal current and my new Speed Coach had me going at 2:00/500 m and I’m not embarrassed to say is the fastest I have ever gotten that Zephyr to move. This time I was very aware of the location of the upriver buoy, rounded it nicely and finished ahead of Mr. Kayaker and Rich and Jeff, the two best dorymen in New England.

We rowed back to the ramp, loaded up the boats, and returned to the boat shop for the last two hotdogs and some highly recommended Ipswich Ale. We met up with Mr. Kayaker and he said he is going to return next year with his rebuilt sliding seat open water shell and give me some competition. Great, more good sporting competition is what makes it fun.

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Yankeerunner
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by Yankeerunner » October 25th, 2021, 11:51 am

PaulG wrote:
October 25th, 2021, 11:03 am
After over a year of cancellations of open water races, Rick Bayko (Yankeerunner on the forum) and I participated in the Mighty Merrimack Rowing Race on Oct 23rd hosted by Lowell’s Boat Shop and Museum (http://lowellsboatshop.com/), America’s oldest operating boat shop. The shop is located in Amesbury, Mass, right on the Merrimack River and the race is more of a fun row than a race but if they are keeping time I’m rowing as hard as I can. Most of the participants were in dories or work boats with two pilot gigs, a kayak, and Rick and I in an Alden Starr and Peinert Zephyr respectively. I’ve rowed this race several times and Rick participated once in a dory. There’s a write up of that on this thread.

We loaded up the boats on my car Friday afternoon and Rick and I discussed the course. It starts out downriver into the current and then crosses the Merrimack River near the Whittier Bridge (Route 95). During the crossing you are subject to strong upriver tidal current and you can be swept upriver of the downriver mark. Once you make the turn you look for a steeple upriver over your right shoulder and eventually you will find a navigation buoy over your left shoulder that marks the upriver turn. Then it’s back to the starting line at the boat shop and repeat a second lap. We launched at a boat ramp upriver of the race course and rowed down to the shop noting the location of the upriver buoy. I remarked that it seemed further downstream than usual.

It was somewhat cold and overcast as we took to the water but it soon became clear and warm. I jockeyed my way to the first line at the start and heard a guy in a dory growl to the kayaker, “keep clear, you don’t want to get under our oars.” What a jerk, it’s supposed to be safe and fun. The horn went off and the kayaker soon left him in his wake. I jumped to the lead and was soon crossing the river to the downstream mark. I was ready for the upstream current and compensated for it and rounded the mark without incident. Then it was upriver with the current with the steeple in view. I had a bead on the steeple and kept looking for the nav buoy but just couldn’t find it. Then I remembered my own advice and looked over my left shoulder. There it was, at least 75 m downstream of me. I completely overshot it! Who put it there? I was not informed! I made a wide turn trying to keep my speed up and by the time I reached the buoy Mr. Kayaker and Jeff and Rich, the two best dorymen in New England, had almost caught up with me in their double dory. I rowed hard into the current and soon had a good lead again. Mr. Kayaker in his Chesapeake Designs kayak was too far out in the middle of the river and almost missed passing through the starting line for the start of the second lap. Both of us learned again that navigation is part of the race.

Then it was a little further downstream and crossing of the river. By this time the current had picked up even more and as I was within 20 m of the downstream buoy, I noticed a patch of smooth, fast moving water. My bow hit that patch and within one boat length I was twisted pointing slightly upriver. A few quick pulls on the starboard oar and I was back on course but closer to the buoy than I wanted. After that I put the hammer down going upriver with the tidal current and my new Speed Coach had me going at 2:00/500 m and I’m not embarrassed to say is the fastest I have ever gotten that Zephyr to move. This time I was very aware of the location of the upriver buoy, rounded it nicely and finished ahead of Mr. Kayaker and Rich and Jeff, the two best dorymen in New England.

We rowed back to the ramp, loaded up the boats, and returned to the boat shop for the last two hotdogs and some highly recommended Ipswich Ale. We met up with Mr. Kayaker and he said he is going to return next year with his rebuilt sliding seat open water shell and give me some competition. Great, more good sporting competition is what makes it fun.
I didn't have as much luck (or is that skill?) in rounding the bouys, having to come to a dead stop a few times after misjudging and almost hitting them. Live & learn. I'm also not saying that having a couple of gallons of water in the hull slowed me down, but I'm also not saying that it didn't. Is that enough excuses for my 3rd place out of 3 performance? :mrgreen:

It was fun though.
55-59: 1:33.5 3:19.2 6:55.7 18:22.0 2:47:26.5
60-64: 1:35.9 3:23.8 7:06.7 18:40.8 2:48:53.6
65-69: 1:38.6 3:31.9 7:19.2 19:26.6 3:02:06.0
70-74: 1:40.2 3:33.4 7:32.6 19:50.5 3:06:36.8
75-76: 1:43.9 3:47.7 7:50.2 20:51.3 3:13:55.7

Tsnor
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by Tsnor » October 26th, 2021, 2:16 pm

really enjoyed reading this. Please all who posted continue to describe your racing.

Open water is really different than flat. Our club rows the Hudson, but does not go out when the river is white capping.

Before my time the club entered the "25K Hudson River Challenge" a few time. It's a race between the George Washington and Tappan Zee Bridges in Nyack, NY. Our 8s swamped often enough we no longer try it -- high swells drive too much water over the side and down you go. The submerged shell is still very stable, so you row with the oar locks under water until you get somewhere you can dump it and get back in.

PaulG
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Re: Open Water Rowing

Post by PaulG » October 29th, 2021, 9:02 am

Tsnor wrote:
October 26th, 2021, 2:16 pm
really enjoyed reading this. Please all who posted continue to describe your racing.

Open water is really different than flat. Our club rows the Hudson, but does not go out when the river is white capping.

Before my time the club entered the "25K Hudson River Challenge" a few time. It's a race between the George Washington and Tappan Zee Bridges in Nyack, NY. Our 8s swamped often enough we no longer try it -- high swells drive too much water over the side and down you go. The submerged shell is still very stable, so you row with the oar locks under water until you get somewhere you can dump it and get back in.
I'm glad you enjoy reading them. They're usually fun to row with the exception of the Minots LIght Roundabout chronicled a few pages back.

There's one more race next Saturday, the Head of the Weir, but I likely will not participate. I'm having dental surgey next week and the Doc has strongly advised against physical exertion for a week. There would likely be gritting of teeth crossing Hull Bay, and although it would really be badass to land at the finish line and spit blood on the beach, I don't think I will do it.

With regard to the leakage in Rick's boat, I have never seen so much water come out of a boat. I'm guessing about 3-5 gallons came out between the hulls and we didn't even have to turn the boat over. Later we put a hose in an access port and put water in the space between the deck and hull and found leaks in the stern. The Starr has a squared off stern and water was coming out from small cracks in the stern. If anyone has seen this before in a Starr let us know. We will be contaciting the manufaturer to see how to fix it.

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