Outrigger height for 6'9".

No, ergs don't yet float, but some of us do, and here's where you get to discuss that other form of rowing.
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AlecSpa
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Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by AlecSpa » May 7th, 2019, 6:23 pm

Pretty much a total noob except for a few days on the water at Craftsbury 4 years ago.

Picked up an old Martin Alden Trainer and had it out for the first time yesterday. It wasn't pretty!

I felt like the blades were going waaaaay to deep (of course it could be my tragic technique). It has adjustable height outriggers and seeing as I was sick they day they covered physics in school, will raising or lowering height put less blade in the water if all other things stay the same?

I understand the normal height is between 14-18cm above the seat.

Thank you in advance for most likely keeping me dry (er)!

Cyclist2
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Re: Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by Cyclist2 » May 8th, 2019, 12:49 am

There are lots of web sites on basic rigging, C2 has a basic one that will get you started; https://www.concept2.com/service/oars/rigging-concepts.

Oarlock height is just one of several adjustments that can be made and they are all interconnected, so there is no one answer. What I'd recommend, rather than messing with the rigging (which can go south real quick - levels, rigging tools, boat position - it gets tricky) is this. Go rowing, sit in the boat and just let the oars float where they want to naturally at the catch, drive and release. Don't put any weight or pressure on them, just let them float through, and notice the path your hands take through the drive part of the stroke. This is the path they should follow when you are actually rowing. The oars are designed to float at the correct depth (blades just barely under the surface) so you shouldn't have to force them up or down.

Most boats are rigged close enough that you'll find it to be OK. And most new rowers tend to exaggerate the vertical movement, i.e. going deep on the drive, and skying on the recovery. Think about moving your hands along the top of a table on the drive, and scrapping your knuckles under the table on the recovery - very little vertical movement.

If you find it to be totally uncomfortable, then find an experienced boatman and have him/her check all the measurements and get it set up for you.
Mark Underwood. Rower first, cyclist too.

jamesg
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Re: Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by jamesg » May 8th, 2019, 3:30 am

the blades were going too deep
Gates too low would cause a vertical pull component forcing the blades deeper, but this is usually the pin angle, which can be adjusted. Especially noticeable if one scull dives more than the other. Also check that your hands are relaxed when pulling: fingers only, so the blade finds its own height. Make sure you don't switch sides; impossible with hatchets, but with older blades the buttons may be worn and it can happen if not clearly marked.

If you scull in rough water and at 6'9 and weight in proportion you may need to set the gates higher than otherwise.
78y, 188cm, 87kg, last seen MHR 163. 2k (24 May 19) 8.46.6@22

AlecSpa
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Re: Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by AlecSpa » May 8th, 2019, 8:55 am

Thank you both for your input!

Waiting on a Gopro mount for the stern of my scull so I can get some videos which I’m sure will provide some unbelievable comic entertainment.

frankieboy
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Re: Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by frankieboy » May 9th, 2019, 4:25 pm

One of the biggest problems newbies face if learning on their own is making sure the oarlocks face the right way. On most singles the Martin included you can revolve the oarlocks 360 degrees (720 or more if you have a mind to). When sat in the boat the oarlocks should face away from you so when you pull the handle the shaft of the oar loads against the part of the oarlock that is over the pin. There's an angle (pitch) on the oarlock that keeps the blade the right height. Having the oarlock pointing towards the bow means that pitch is now working against you. One more thing, even experienced scullers sometimes get distracted and leave the dock with one facing one way and one the other.

AlecSpa
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Re: Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by AlecSpa » May 10th, 2019, 11:09 am

frankieboy wrote:
May 9th, 2019, 4:25 pm
One of the biggest problems newbies face if learning on their own is making sure the oarlocks face the right way. On most singles the Martin included you can revolve the oarlocks 360 degrees (720 or more if you have a mind to). When sat in the boat the oarlocks should face away from you so when you pull the handle the shaft of the oar loads against the part of the oarlock that is over the pin. There's an angle (pitch) on the oarlock that keeps the blade the right height. Having the oarlock pointing towards the bow means that pitch is now working against you. One more thing, even experienced scullers sometimes get distracted and leave the dock with one facing one way and one the other.
:!:

Cyclist2
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Re: Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by Cyclist2 » May 10th, 2019, 11:19 pm

frankieboy wrote:
May 9th, 2019, 4:25 pm
One of the biggest problems newbies face if learning on their own is making sure the oarlocks face the right way. On most singles the Martin included you can revolve the oarlocks 360 degrees (720 or more if you have a mind to). When sat in the boat the oarlocks should face away from you so when you pull the handle the shaft of the oar loads against the part of the oarlock that is over the pin. There's an angle (pitch) on the oarlock that keeps the blade the right height. Having the oarlock pointing towards the bow means that pitch is now working against you. One more thing, even experienced scullers sometimes get distracted and leave the dock with one facing one way and one the other.
True, but not quite right. The oarlocks must point toward the stern so the oar presses against the pin on the drive. If the oarlocks face the bow, the oar is pressing against the outside of the oarlock - not a solid connection and who knows what the pitch of that side is. It is virtually impossible to row with them backwards. Also the pitch doesn't set the height of the oar, it just very slightly tilts the blade through the stroke so that the catch doesn't dive deep and the release comes out easily. The height is a separate adjustment at the oarlock.

And every rower has undoubtedly got it backwards at least once (unless the boat is rigged so that they can only face the right way) and knows it immediately, believe me!
Mark Underwood. Rower first, cyclist too.

frankieboy
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Re: Outrigger height for 6'9".

Post by frankieboy » May 11th, 2019, 6:04 pm

Cyclist2 I don't think you read my post properly. When sat in the boat the oarlocks face away from you. When sat in the boat you are looking towards the stern, the oarlocks point to the stern, they face away from you. Yes any experience rower will spot the problem in a stroke or two but novices, not so much, common problem particularly if learning to do it from video or on your own

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