OK to row every day?

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sekitori
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Re: OK to row every day?

Post by sekitori » March 7th, 2018, 5:27 pm

burritomike wrote: The "easy rows" you mention might make excellent active recovery sessions on those days your shoulder needs a break!
The definition of "taking a break" is to stop doing something for a short period of time; to rest. An easy row still consists of using your shoulder muscles. If someone's shoulder needs a break, I think the best way to do it would be to rest it instead of continuing to use it in a less demanding way.

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burritomike
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Re: OK to row every day?

Post by burritomike » March 8th, 2018, 12:36 pm

sekitori wrote:
burritomike wrote: The "easy rows" you mention might make excellent active recovery sessions on those days your shoulder needs a break!
The definition of "taking a break" is to stop doing something for a short period of time; to rest. An easy row still consists of using your shoulder muscles. If someone's shoulder needs a break, I think the best way to do it would be to rest it instead of continuing to use it in a less demanding way.
There is a ton of research showing the recuperative and restorative benefits of active recovery. Easy rows, I think, could qualify as active recovery. Depends on the individual and the intensity. Dictionary.com says "take a break" means "To rest or cease temporarily from working" which someone could very well do while still rowing. I don't disagree that most humans need to take breaks from high intensity training here and there (like when the shoulder needs a break!) but for many people staying active and moving around can be extremely helpful. So yeah, take a break from HIGH INTENSITY training, but don't stop training unless a real injury necessitates complete immobility.
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estragon
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Re: OK to row every day?

Post by estragon » March 9th, 2018, 5:04 pm

burritomike wrote:
sekitori wrote:
burritomike wrote: The "easy rows" you mention might make excellent active recovery sessions on those days your shoulder needs a break!
The definition of "taking a break" is to stop doing something for a short period of time; to rest. An easy row still consists of using your shoulder muscles. If someone's shoulder needs a break, I think the best way to do it would be to rest it instead of continuing to use it in a less demanding way.
There is a ton of research showing the recuperative and restorative benefits of active recovery. Easy rows, I think, could qualify as active recovery. Depends on the individual and the intensity. Dictionary.com says "take a break" means "To rest or cease temporarily from working" which someone could very well do while still rowing. I don't disagree that most humans need to take breaks from high intensity training here and there (like when the shoulder needs a break!) but for many people staying active and moving around can be extremely helpful. So yeah, take a break from HIGH INTENSITY training, but don't stop training unless a real injury necessitates complete immobility.
If "your shoulder needs break" then best to give it a break. It's well known that, for most of us, rest days are essential to allow the body to recover and get stronger. It's why marathon runners taper their training distances and intensity in the last 3 weeks before a race. It strengthens them, ready for the big day.

I used to run regularly -- 4 or 5 times a week. The day after my weekly long run, when my legs needed a break, the last thing my body wanted to do was run, even a very gentle jog. What would be the point? Much better to give those particular leg muscles a day off, and avoid any more pounding. If I wanted to do some exercise I would gently swim or take a leisurely bike ride. Both activities use the legs but different muscles, and without the same skeletal impact. Mentally, it was healthy too. Same with rowing -- I enjoy erging, but there's more to life than sliding up and down a steel rail indoors!

I do hear what you're saying -- if you're recovering from injury or muscular overuse, some very gentle movement in the affected area can certainly be useful for recuperation if the alternative is seizing up. But in the main, for post-tough-session soreness it's definitely advisable to either rest up completely, or do some gentle cross-training that uses other muscle groups.

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