Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

General discussions about getting and staying fit that don't relate directly to your indoor rower
Catwheezle
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Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Catwheezle » November 25th, 2020, 9:15 pm

H i all, I've got COPD and 23% lung function so I cant walk far but I need to build thigh muscle and back. I thought maybe rowing would be good as all my weight is held by the rower while I exercise. I can't get out to try a rower - never used one before. I like the sound of the concept but am concerned that you have to go fast in order to get the resistance up. What I want to do is exercise my muscles but if it takes too much effort or conversely if I have to go really fast then I will just get out of breath in 3 minutes and that is no good. I know this is probably a bit of a stretch but just wanted to gather some ideas, maybe someone here has something that causes breathlessness, maybe asthma or heart problems and can advise. I am wondering if you think a magnetic rower might be better for me, and if so any recommendations. thanks

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Citroen
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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Citroen » November 26th, 2020, 4:13 am

There's a whole bunch of things that are absolutely wrong in your ideas.

You do not have to "go fast" (whatever that means to you) to "get the resistance up" (whatever that means to you).

We've had folks at 100 years old rowing.
https://www.concept2.com/indoor-rowers/ ... weight=All

Dangerscouse
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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Dangerscouse » November 26th, 2020, 4:20 am

Catwheezle wrote:
November 25th, 2020, 9:15 pm
H i all, I've got COPD and 23% lung function so I cant walk far but I need to build thigh muscle and back. I thought maybe rowing would be good as all my weight is held by the rower while I exercise. I can't get out to try a rower - never used one before. I like the sound of the concept but am concerned that you have to go fast in order to get the resistance up. What I want to do is exercise my muscles but if it takes too much effort or conversely if I have to go really fast then I will just get out of breath in 3 minutes and that is no good. I know this is probably a bit of a stretch but just wanted to gather some ideas, maybe someone here has something that causes breathlessness, maybe asthma or heart problems and can advise. I am wondering if you think a magnetic rower might be better for me, and if so any recommendations. thanks
Hi, the beauty of the C2 is that you can lower the drag factor down very low, and the pace can be whatever you want it to be, so you will be able to control your effort in a meaningful way, whilst utilising your thighs and back, albeit they won't be getting worked like you would if you did squats for example, especially if you need to take it easy.

If you have specific goals to get a longer workout, and you don't get tempted into going too fast, the C2 is absolutely a great option for you. I've never used a magnetic rower, but I can't overstate the benefits of a C2.

Best of luck with it all, and exercising with lung disease must be extremely difficult
47 HWT; 6' 4"; 1k= 3:09; 2k= 6:36; 5k= 17:24; 6k= 21:09; 10k= 35:46 30mins= 8,428m 60mins= 16,461m HM= 1:16.47; FM= 2:44:04; 50k= 3:21:14; 100k= 7:52:44; 12hrs = 153km

"You reap what you row"

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by mict450 » November 26th, 2020, 4:57 am

Hold on!! Stop the train! 23% lung function? You're a grade 4 COPD'er!!! Your pulmonologist know what you're up to? This forum is not the place to solicit advice for an exercise prescription, especially with your advance stage of respiratory dysfunction. You basically have no respiratory reserve & you want to strengthen your legs & back. There are gentler exercise modes more suited to your condition than a rower.

I think you'd be better off consulting your MD before investing your money in any exercise machine.

Sorry to be so harsh, but you just sitting in your easy chair is like a healthy person after running a marathon.
Eric, YOB:1954
Shasta County, CA, small town USA

Dangerscouse
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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Dangerscouse » November 26th, 2020, 5:30 am

mict450 wrote:
November 26th, 2020, 4:57 am
Hold on!! Stop the train! 23% lung function? You're a grade 4 COPD'er!!! Your pulmonologist know what you're up to? This forum is not the place to solicit advice for an exercise prescription, especially with your advance stage of respiratory dysfunction. You basically have no respiratory reserve & you want to strengthen your legs & back. There are gentler exercise modes more suited to your condition than a rower.

I think you'd be better off consulting your MD before investing your money in any exercise machine.

Sorry to be so harsh, but you just sitting in your easy chair is like a healthy person after running a marathon.
Good job you know what you're talking about Eric, it didn't mean anything to me.
47 HWT; 6' 4"; 1k= 3:09; 2k= 6:36; 5k= 17:24; 6k= 21:09; 10k= 35:46 30mins= 8,428m 60mins= 16,461m HM= 1:16.47; FM= 2:44:04; 50k= 3:21:14; 100k= 7:52:44; 12hrs = 153km

"You reap what you row"

Instagram: stuwenman

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Ombrax » November 26th, 2020, 5:41 am

IF, I'll repeat, IF the OP's medical team clears him/her to use a rower, I'll throw this out there:

A C2 rower can be as easy or as challenging as you like. The drag is controlled by a damper lever, which can be set quite high or quite low, and the force required to overcome that drag can be very high if you push/pull hard, or very low if you don't push/pull hard.

Best of luck to the OP, I hope your health improves sufficiently for you to safely exercise to the degree that you desire. But whatever you do, don't try to push yourself too much - in my experience I've found that that's always counterproductive.

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by mict450 » November 26th, 2020, 6:21 am

Dangerscouse wrote:
November 26th, 2020, 5:30 am

Good job you know what you're talking about Eric, it didn't mean anything to me.
Thanks for your comments, Stu. I just hope I haven't scared away the OP with my bluntness.
Eric, YOB:1954
Shasta County, CA, small town USA

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ampire
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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by ampire » November 26th, 2020, 1:04 pm

A recumbent bike might be a better machine to use. Talk to your doctor and get cleared for exercise first.
M34|5'8"/173CM|150lb/68KG|LWT|MHR 192|RHR 42|2020: 5K 18:52.9 (@1:53.2/500)|C2-D+Slides+EndureRow Seat

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Catwheezle » November 27th, 2020, 5:19 pm

Thank you everyone - yes I am a stage 4 COPDer. Thanks for all your advice, I think after reading this I should wait to try one at the gym once COVID risk has gone, or just try a cheap one first to see if I can even cope at all. Its a lot of money if, as you say, I might struggle with it.

I did talk to the pulmonary rehab team and they didn't say outright no, but they seem to think I could just do the rehab exercises like sit to stand and wall squats but that is what I struggle with as it involves holding up my whole body weight. If only I had a no-chlorine swimming pool! Thank you so much everyone for taking the time and trouble to give your honest answers - (not too blunt at all). It's greatly appreciated

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ampire
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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by ampire » November 28th, 2020, 2:37 pm

Catwheezle wrote:
November 27th, 2020, 5:19 pm
Thank you everyone - yes I am a stage 4 COPDer. Thanks for all your advice, I think after reading this I should wait to try one at the gym once COVID risk has gone, or just try a cheap one first to see if I can even cope at all. Its a lot of money if, as you say, I might struggle with it.

I did talk to the pulmonary rehab team and they didn't say outright no, but they seem to think I could just do the rehab exercises like sit to stand and wall squats but that is what I struggle with as it involves holding up my whole body weight. If only I had a no-chlorine swimming pool! Thank you so much everyone for taking the time and trouble to give your honest answers - (not too blunt at all). It's greatly appreciated
Cheap rowers are not worth the money.

Recumbent bike is a great option for people who suffer infirmity. They don't require any technique, just sit and pedal. They have a range of resistance: you can get a pretty challenging workout on it or you can go for a casual cruise. Also they are nice for some exercise while TV viewing.
M34|5'8"/173CM|150lb/68KG|LWT|MHR 192|RHR 42|2020: 5K 18:52.9 (@1:53.2/500)|C2-D+Slides+EndureRow Seat

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Ombrax
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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Ombrax » November 28th, 2020, 8:09 pm

It isn't clear to me why a recumbent bicycle would be preferable over a C2 rower for rehab.

Other than the issue of technique (and even that's debatable) the erg can be easy or it can be hard. Regarding technique, I'll agree that rowing is possibly a bit more technical then cycling, but remember that the majority of the folks who use rowers at the gym do so with pretty poor technique and zero knowledge about stuff like Drag Factors, and it isn't the end of the world for them.

Granted there's always the "anyone can just hop on a bike and ride" thing, but that's setting the bar pretty low, and folks on the harder-core cycling forums would certainly tell you that that sort of rider also has pretty bad cycling technique. With just a bit of effort perusing the C2 site for information on how to use the erg, I'm confident that most folks can become competent rowers, especially if their intensity level is not going to be super-hard.

Personally, I think that if the OP's doctors give him (her?) clearance for mild exercise and he's interested in rowing then I'd say go for it and try the rower - it's certainly able to provide as easy or as difficult workout as he'd like.

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by mict450 » November 29th, 2020, 1:58 am

Catwheezle wrote:
November 27th, 2020, 5:19 pm
Thank you everyone - yes I am a stage 4 COPDer. Thanks for all your advice, I think after reading this I should wait to try one at the gym once COVID risk has gone, or just try a cheap one first to see if I can even cope at all. Its a lot of money if, as you say, I might struggle with it.

I did talk to the pulmonary rehab team and they didn't say outright no, but they seem to think I could just do the rehab exercises like sit to stand and wall squats but that is what I struggle with as it involves holding up my whole body weight. If only I had a no-chlorine swimming pool! Thank you so much everyone for taking the time and trouble to give your honest answers - (not too blunt at all). It's greatly appreciated
Glad to hear you are holding off on your purchase. Best wishes to you.
Eric, YOB:1954
Shasta County, CA, small town USA

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by jamesg » November 29th, 2020, 4:51 am

pulmonary rehab team. just do the rehab exercises. sit to stand, squats. struggle with body weight.
Sooner or later you'll need an erg: they last for ever, no electric connection, exercise as light or as hard as we wish, no body mass to lift. However like all equipment they need a little collaboration to work any miracles, and take up some space.

If doable and sufficient for now, you could use some simple sitting exercises that don't involve your entire weight, but use the large muscles in legs and hips or shoulders. Sitting, just lift a leg or two, or even most of your weight with the arms. There are dozens of exercises like this that can work any muscle you like, without overloading your CV system. You'll soon be back to normal if you keep at it.
08-1940, 183cm, 84kg. Last seen MHR 155, in 2k (2020-12-03) 8.47.6@23

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Fl_Rower » November 29th, 2020, 4:50 pm

I hope this is helpful (isn't medical or even any (e.g. fitness) advice, more commentary(though I am not sure commentary is viewed as valid here, mod's run a very tight ship and welcome to delete this) as to what I am doing: I welcome comments, it might help me too...

I have (pretty bad) Asthma and very out of shape- When I started rowing I could only handle a few minutes at a time (end of July 2020).. I now am able to row 1500Meters + I learned through Dark Horse YouTube videos, RowPro email (Peter was very helpful) and this forum:
1. Rower effort... I was putting more effort into it than I thought, I just needed to use less effort. Walking pace (HR equivalent) vs running..
lower drag factor (maybe lever to 1=lowest drag factor)
use arms only, legs only, body only (hinge) --- (Dark Horse "pick drills") -- that alone can be a lot of effort so reduce time on machine.
very short time on rower, possibly multiple times a day
2. If I make it super simple and enjoyable I want to return again same day or next, if I am over exhausted I lose momentum and do not return.
3. I realize 1500meters probably won't get me into shape (viewtopic.php?f=8&t=192645) it is better than nothing and I think through careful incremental effort I will get there (based on my original ability to row for minutes vs now). At worse hopefully my health will not decline further, there will be some circulatory improvement
4. I tried magnetic rower - needs to be powered (I want to be able to pull the rower outside without dragging a long power cable) and it didn't feel natural. Water rowers were more natural.I enjoyed the Concept 2 community / apps ( Water rower may have some of this too, I didn't educate myself too much).

The other thing I would consider is spending time in a swimming pool, gently moving arms and legs (there are I believe aerobic exercises in water - low impact but I have no knowledge or experience).. in the shallow end so no need to swim. I would do this but I don't like the chlorinated pools and if it isn't over 89 degrees F it is too cold.

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Re: Lung disease & concept 2/ or magnetic rower

Post by Parky » November 30th, 2020, 12:14 pm

As a geriatric I would suggest having a look at a "Crane 6 in 1 multi trainer" or similar. It's lightweight, effective and the tension is adjustable. Ideal if you just want to exercise your legs/thighs. My wife uses it seated on a chair or kneeling, and it's a fraction of the cost of an ERG.
Hwt M - 74yrs - 17st 4lbs

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